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One-Hour Workshops: Block 4

Block 4Friday 8:00-9:00 AM
  • Communications and Advancement
    • Practical Tools to Make Your Messages Sing

      103

      Making your mission and vision statements more unique and compelling? Getting everyone in your school delivering the same key messages? Impossible? Not at all! Focusing on both the high-level mission and vision and the practical day-to-day work of describing the school, learn practical tools you can use in your school immediately. Bring your questions to discuss with the group.
      Presented BySkip Kotkins, Carney, Sandoe & Associates (WA); Amanda Darling, Lakeside School (WA)
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      TrackCommunications and Advancement
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can you make your mission and vision statements truly unique and still have an inclusive process?  How can you have an inclusive process in which everyone contributes to and then adopts a few vital key messages that they use to talk about the school?  What is the role of messaging in today's competitive, demanding independent school world?
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    • Rock Your School’s Website: Lessons from 3,000+ Independent Schools

      206

      The results are in! Learn the outcomes from an industrywide website navigation and usability survey of 3,000+ private school websites. See how schools position themselves for success. Explore how many schools are building responsive websites and how they utilize navigation and content. Use the survey results as a brand new tool to evaluate your website navigation against industry standard practices.
      Presented ByPeter Baron, Blackbaud (NH); Stacy Jagodowski, Cheshire Academy (CT)
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      TrackCommunications and Advancement
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How do you use analytics, SEO, and survey data to drive your site’s navigation and usability? What is information architecture and why is it critical to your site’s success? How can you use the results from the Independent School Website Navigation study to improve your school’s website?
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    • Solicitation Savvy = Fearless Fund-Raising

      305

      A little experience is all you need to learn the positive language and mindset for enjoying gift solicitation and doing it well. Design a successful solicitation strategy, identify tips and techniques for training volunteer fund-raisers, learn how to address donor objections, and work through a case study that provides an opportunity to put theory into practice.
      Presented ByStarr Snead, Advancement Connections (SC); Shelley Reese, The Learning Center for the Deaf (MA)
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      TrackCommunications and Advancement
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore What (subtle or not-so-subtle) signals do donors give that help us know how and when and why to ask them for a gift?  How do we get to a yes and what happens when we geta no when we ask for a gift?  What role should volunteers, heads, trustees, and advancement professionals play in the process?
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    • What Keeps You up at Night? Prepare for What Could be Your School's Worst Event

      210

      Even the strongest, best prepared leaders fear crises, which can feel very unsettling. There are ways you can prepare in advance in addition to policies and procedures. Discuss crises ranging from sexual misconduct to the death of a student and many others. Gain proven strategies that will help manage the unimaginable. Analyze the current crisis landscape and best practices.
      Presented ByJane Hulbert, The Jane Group (IL); Myra McGovern, NAIS (DC)
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      TrackCommunications and Advancement
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What can I do in advance to prepare for a crisis? What a crisis team is, who is on it and how should they train as a team? What are the first steps in a crisis?
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  • Governance
    • Do the Right Thing: Understand That Head of School Employment Contract

      109

      Examine the key parts of a head of school employment agreement. Explore examples of key contract provisions, how to research what to expect and ask from your school, strategy, the role of the school's search consultant, and how to keep the negotiations in perspective with your family. Questions and participation welcomed.
      Presented ByTerrence Briggs, Bowditch & Dewey, LLP (MA); Ronald Cino, Worcester Academy (MA)
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      TrackGovernance
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore Can a civilian learn to understand what the terms of a head of school employment contract mean?  Even if I understand what the contract means, what good will it do me?  Will there still have to be lawyers involved?
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    • Steps Your School Should Take to Ensure Healthy Employee Interactions with Students

      110

      Helping employees set and maintain appropriate boundaries with students takes a systemic approach by schools — from the trustee level down to every employee. Learn the steps your school should take, including adoption of codes of conduct policies, training programs, and educating employees on setting and maintaining appropriate boundaries and knowing when to come forward with concerns.
      Presented ByLinda Johnson, McLane, Graf, Raulerson & Middleton Professional Association (NH); Chris Day, Holderness School (NH)
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      TrackGovernance
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore What steps should a school take to help ensure appropriate and healthy interactions between employees and students?  What kinds of policies and training programs should all schools have in this area?  What steps should a school take to respond to situations of this nature that arise?
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  • Leadership Development
    • Accreditation: A Transformative Process

      105

      The shift from an emphasis on school sustainability to innovation and revolution is reflected in the approach that forward-thinking independent school associations are taking regarding the role and promise of the accreditation process. In the interest of school improvement and strategic thinking, discuss with accreditation directors how the process leads schools to relevance, renewal, and disruptive innovation.
      Presented ByJudith Sheridan and George Swain, New York State Association of Independent Schools (NY); James Mooney, New England Association of Schools and Colleges (MA); Mary Malter, Pennsylvania Association of Independent Schools (PA); Betsy Hunroe, Virginia Association of Independent Schools (VA)
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      TrackLeadership Development
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How does the accreditation process provide a platform for innovation? What similarities and differences distinguish the accreditation process from strategic planning?   How does the consideration of core values and best practices during the accreditation process pave the road to change?
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    • Going to School Where Your Parent Is Head: The Real Story from "Faculty Brats"

      300

      How do we better support the learning of faculty children while their parents lead? What is it like to attend the school your parent leads? What are the benefits and drawbacks? What could improve this experience? What does the school need to be aware of for these kids? Join three panelists who can answer these questions and more based on their personal experiences as children of heads who attended or presently attend their parent's school.
      Presented ByJodi McGary, licensed clinical social worker (MA); Bridgman Sellers, senior at Friends’ Central School (PA); Elizabeth Suitor, junior at Wentworth Institute of Technology (MA)
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      TrackLeadership Development
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      LevelAdvanced
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    • Leading and Teaching Through Listening: A Learning Paradigm of Connection

      309

      Come to this fun, interactive workshop to explore your listening style and your capacity to help your students navigate the challenges they encounter in school and life. As we innovate in our schools, we inevitably instigate change, creating an opportunity for growth if it is reflected on and understood. Learn how to listen closely, building a muscle of reflection so our students can develop resilient engagement with the revolution.
      Presented ByEllen Honnet, Stanley H. King Counseling Institute (MA); Jack Creeden, School Year Abroad (MA)
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      TrackLeadership Development
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How might we as educators best help students reap the benefits from innovations we put in place in our schools, and how will we know what the impact of the "revolution" has been?  What specific listening skills do we bring to our conversations with students and how might we expand our repertoire?  How do we help build a "muscle of reflection" in our students, helping them grow their capacity to learn from their experiences?
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    • Pros, Cons, and Uses of Next-Generation Assessment Tools

      102

      Surely we test our students enough already – and at too great a cost? Many schools are finding great value in using next-generation value-add assessments. Uncover how NAIS and schools are using these new assessment tools — MAP, HSSSE, MSA, and PISA-based testing —  for advocacy purposes and to advance institutional and critical instructional goals.
      Presented ByAmada Torres, NAIS (DC); Jonathan Martin, Jonathan E. Martin Ed Services (AZ)
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      TrackLeadership Development
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore Why should my school add new assessments? What value is there and what is the cost-benefit ratio of doing so? What are the pros and cons of four particular cutting edge tools?
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    • School Health and Alignment of Value Language

      200

      Fellowship Workshop

      This presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByRobert Blackwell, Adelson Educational Campus (NV); Allen Broyles, The Howard School (GA); Michael Magno, Providence Day School (NC); Robert McQuitty, Aidan Montessori School (DC); John Melton, The Country School (MD); Jaiwant Mulik, The O’Neal School (NC)
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      TrackLeadership Development
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    • The Courage to Change: Gender Identity in our Schools

      200

      Fellowship Workshop

      This presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByJulie Bragdon, Montessori School of Denver (CO); Christi Campbell, Ascension Episcopal School (LA); Beth Mulvey, Indian Springs School (AL); Jason Seggern, Delaware Valley Friends School (DE); Kevin Soja, Episcopal High School (VA); Stacy Turner, Hamlin Robinson School (WA)
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      TrackLeadership Development
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  • Management
    • Develop, Market, and Manage Revenue-Enhancing Summer Programming at Your Institution

      308

      Explore the why and how-to steps, tools, and resources to evaluate and develop successful summer programs. Learn what others are doing and discover how these programs are conceived, launched, marketed, and operated from industry insiders who have done so for private and nonprofit entities in the day camp, sleep-away camp, and education arenas. Evaluate program development using a provided decision matrix.
      Presented ByEric Stein and Jill Tipograph, Everything Summer (NY); Peter Gilbert, Salisbury School (CT); Noah Cooper and Margaret Cooper, Ivy League School (NY)
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      TrackManagement
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How can you assess alternatives and providers for summer programming?How can you meaningfully compete for summer program enrollment in your first year?  How can you evaluate existing programs, make needed changes, or get started?
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    • How to Simplify Managing Your School’s IT in the Age of 1-to-1, 1+1, BYOD, and BRYD

      306

      The historical management model of a centrally, fully controlled IT environment is expensive, ineffective, and counter productive. What is your school’s goal for technology use and deployment? Are you meeting that goal? Is your IT management paradigm assisting the institution or impeding its progress? How does the school evaluate if the current technology model being instituted is as effective as it can be for you students? Come find answers.
      Presented ByJames Huffaker and Mark Davies, The Hun School of Princeton (NJ)
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      TrackManagement
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What is your school’s goal for technology use and deployment? - Are you meeting that goal? -Is your IT management paradigm assisting the institution or impeding its progress?
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    • Is Your School Community Prepared for a Strategic Enrollment Management Plan?

      301

      Those of us entrenched in schools are currently seeing a paradigm shift in admissions. Schools are transitioning in how they attract prospective students by moving from the traditional admission process to strategic enrollment management. Learn how to fill seats and become solvent and resilient against any economic downturn that may affect enrollment. The answer is strategic enrollment management.
      Presented ByChris Pryor and Fred McGaughan, Gowan Group (NY); John Barrengos, The Putney School (VT)
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      TrackManagement
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore What are the essential elements to a comprehensive strategic enrollment management plan? How can trustees and the head of school play a supportive and active role in enrollment management? How would YOUR school benefit from a comprehensive plan?
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    • Measuring Best Practices in Institutional Sustainability

      108

      Explore Protostar, a robust tool to measure sustainability initiatives at independent schools, using three case studies. Discuss how you can use Protostar to spur intraschool collaboration, as well as your school’s sustainability efforts.
      Presented ByFrank Barros, King Low-Heywood Thomas (MA); James Bentley, St. Johnsbury Academy (VT); Katrina Linthorst Homan, Choate Rosemary Hall (CT)
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      TrackManagement
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore Why and how does Protostar reflect "best practices" in sustainability? What are some good examples that justify the time used to gather sustainability data?    How can schools contribute to the evolution of Protostar metrics?  
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    • Outside-the-Box Thinking in Independent School Admission

      201

      Traditional admission funnel tactics are failing. NAIS schools must communicate hard-to-quantify benefits to busy, financially nervous, and inconsistently informed families. A set of novel outside-the-box tactics delivered a 110 percent increase in applications for one school through the recession. The tactics are transportable and offer a path for enrollment health nationally.
      Presented ByPeter Anderson, The Episcopal Academy (PA)
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      TrackManagement
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore Why are traditional admission funnel tactics failing? What set of novel tactics successfully addresses the key marketing constraints of independent schools? How can these tactics be successfully absorbed and employed by any independent school?
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    • Private for All to See: The Limits and Lessons of Confidentiality in an Online World

      204

      Social media presents independent school employees and students with both opportunities and hazards. Develop a framework for discussing how to navigate the issues that arise when technology catapults private lives into the public eye.
      Presented ByMichael Blacher, Liebert Cassidy Whitmore (CA)
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      TrackManagement
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can students and staff best minimize the risk of having their personal information become public information in their school community?  What best practices can you implement to prevent and address social media that may negatively affect your school community?  What recent relevant cases have other independent schools dealt with that can provide crucial insights?
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  • The Classroom Experience
    • A Model in Collaboration: Merging STEAM and Global Studies

      313

      STEAM and global studies are popular programs that often compete as schools determine how to allocate resources. Examine how teachers of both programs are using interdisciplinary activities to collaborate, using project-based learning and developing service projects that address water quality and energy in rural communities.
      Presented ByCecelia Pan, Kelly Neely, and Chris Harman, Brimmer and May School (MA); George Stewart, Education First (MA); Devon Ducharme, St. George's School (RI); Joseph Levine, Organization for Tropical Studies (MA)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can teachers enable students to confront and solve real-world issues through interdisciplinary projects? How can merging STEAM and Global Studies teach 21st century skills? What global issues require interdisciplinary approaches to problem solving?
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    • Bringing the Maker Movement to K – 3 Students

      202

      Learn how to set up a mini makerspace that encourages your K – 3 students to tinker and play. Journey through specific examples of maker projects that work well with early elementary students. With projects like taking apart old keyboards, creating handheld games with cardboard and masking tape, and building simple circuits, it's easy to create the perfect conditions for younger students to explore, invent, and learn!
      Presented ByAlice Baggett, Seattle Country Day School (WA)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How can I set up a successful mini makerspace for K-3 students?   What philosophical ideas should guide the creation of this space?   What are some specific activities I can do with my K-3 students?
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    • Building a Successful 1:1 iPad Program: All Students, All Faculty, All In

      203

      Learn how Dana Hall School conceived, designed, and implemented its successful 1:1 iPad initiative. Explore the timeline, support structure, change strategy, program goals, assessments, and student involvement. Gain valuable insights into 1:1 program development in light of education in the 21st century.
      Presented ByElizabeth Paushter, Charles Breslin, and Robert Mather, Dana Hall School (MA)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How do you create a plan and roll it out? How do you develop a successful support framework? How do you assess the program?
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    • Education for Global Citizenship: People, Food, Energy, and Sustainability

      104

      Discover interdisciplinary, hands-on activities to help students think critically and creatively about global challenges to the planet and human well-being. Engage in activities that build skills in several content areas while introducing concepts of sustainability, resource use, and living conditions around the globe.
      Presented ByPolly Vanasse, Lesley Ellis School (MA)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore Why is it important to teach young people about global challenges such as population growth, climate change, and social inequities?  How can you construct an interdisciplinary unit to teach about global issues that is interactive, inquiry-based, and age-appropriate?  How can you incorporate this unit with the 21st century skills that global citizens will need?
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    • From Rocket Stoves to Robohands – Engaging Students Through Real-World Projects

      312

      Providing students with the opportunity to learn through innovative projects that address real-world problems can have immeasurable effects on their learning and engagement. Using two such projects (The Global Efficient Cookstove and Brookwood Robohand Projects) as models, uncover the benefits, challenges, and rewards that result from connecting students to their world through work such as this.
      Presented ByRich Lehrer, Brookwood School (MA)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What are the benefits, challenges, and rewards of involving students in real-world projects?  What are the steps to mounting a real-world learning project?  What are 21st century skills and how can they be taught through real-world projects?
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    • Globally Relevant and Culturally Responsive Classrooms: A Design Thinking Model

      101

      Add a global dimension to service learning and enable deep classroom discourse about race, class, and power by using the Nobis Global Action Model. This innovative design thinking approach guides students to comprehend and devise ways to respond to global issues through the use of technology. This model focuses on students’ learning using media, creativity, critical thinking, problem solving, and teamwork – all with a global perspective.
      Presented ByChristen Clougherty, Nobis Project, Inc. (GA); Will Nisbet, Maret School (DC); Natania Kremer, Brooklyn Friends School (NY)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can I be more culturally responsive in my teaching about global issues? How can we as a school (teachers, administration, students, parents, board) foster conversations around such issues as global citizenship, race, equity, and human rights? How can I use design thinking and technology to engage students in addressing global challenges?
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    • How to Revolutionize Academic Courses for Deeper, Engaged Learning

      Ballroom C

      Blended Learning Workshop

      Can one teach individualized curricula simultaneously in a single class? Use a design thinking framework to understand how students can pursue their own curiosities in the same class with common learning goals. The approach is possible, practical, and inspiring for both students and teachers. Results are more relevance, deeper engagement, and joy in learning. This case study will yield an easy, usable process.
      Presented ByJamie Baker and Mitchell Pinkowski, Pomfret School (CT)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How can one relinquish control of content while maintaining high expectations and rigorous learning outcomes for students? How can one redesign a course so that it satisfies student preferences for the learning experience and content? How can one design a meaningful curriculum that results in skill mastery as well as the development of the lifelong habits of insightful reading and self-directed, perpetual learning?
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    • Instructional Tech Tools for Independent Schools

      Ballroom B

      We are in the foothills of the ed tech revolution.  Fueled by advances in bandwidth, mobile computing, neuroscience, and big data, we are starting to see models of teaching and learning that allow for customization and differentiation.  These new tools generate higher engagement, better retention, and lower costs. Here are the best players and how to deploy them.
      Presented ByJohn Katzman, Noodle (NY); Betsy Corcoran, EdSurge (CA); Joel Rose, New Classrooms (NY)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      Explore What are the best instructional technologies available? What do they do and what do they cost? These technologies are mostly being developed for large markets—K-12 school districts, and not to independent schools.  How can we best access them, and how do they fit into our schools?
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    • Rethink and Redesign 21st Century Summer Learning

      302

      Examine how five independent schools design summer programs that provide students with 21st century learning opportunities, faculty with a unique lab setting to pilot new content, and a resource to leverage public partnerships. Uncover specific ways independent schools stand to benefit from implementing innovative summer programs and essential questions that interested schools should consider.
      Presented ByCharles Housiaux, Ransom Everglades School (FL); Paula Williams, Albuquerque Academy (NM);Mikki Frazier Head-Royce School (CA); Jim Patterson, Harvard-Westlake School (CA)
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      TrackThe Classroom Experience
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How can summer programs foster innovative curriculum, pedagogy, and programming? How can summer learning opportunities enhance traditional school year curricular options for students? How can a school leverage summer programs for 21st century innovation?
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  • The Student Experience
    • Imagining a Future-Friendly School: Student Voice, Global Citizenship, and the Environment

      111

      Schools around the world are working to drive student engagement by ensuring deep, relevant, and authentic learning. Future-friendly schools are part of a global network developing competencies and sharing practices around the values of global citizenship, environmental stewardship, and student voice, measured through a crowd-sourced set of indicators you can use to assess your school's progress. Join us to reflect and learn more!
      Presented ByMichael Furdyk, TakingITGlobal (CANADA); Michael Adams, American School Foundation of Monterrey (MEXICO)
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      TrackThe Student Experience
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore Why are global citizenship, environmental stewardship, and student voice important for 21st century teaching and learning? What tools and resources can independent schools access support 21st century teaching and learning? How can independent schools assess their engagement in global citizenship, environmental stewardship, and student voice, and develop a roadmap to strengthen their work in these areas?
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    • Innovation by Design: Revolutionizing Student-Driven Learning

      310

      Berwick Academy has experienced exciting growth and national recognition of its Innovation Center. Its evolution has touched almost every aspect of strategic thinking and desired student learning outcomes. BIC utilizes elements of design thinking, collaboration, networking, and public demonstration. BIC has created substantial opportunities in marketing, hiring, community relations, and fund-raising. Learn how.
      Presented ByDarcy Coffta, Gregory Schneider, and Eric Rawn, Berwick Academy (ME); John Gulla, The Edward E. Ford Foundation (NY)
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      TrackThe Student Experience
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore What is unique about Berwick’s Innovation Center and how does it encompass design thinking elements in a student-driven model? What are the key components of the program and how could they be implemented at my school? What is special about the student experience and what differentiates our students in the college application process?
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    • Mindfulness: How to Change Your School Culture by Doing Nothing

      311

      By practicing mindfulness (doing nothing – on purpose – for a given amount of time), we can reinvigorate and transform ourselves, our students, and our schools in positive ways. Benefits of mindfulness include improved academics and emotionally richer lives. See how cultivating mindfulness in schools is highly conducive to a design thinking culture.
      Presented ByLarry Kahn, Iolani School (HI); Christa Forster and James Houlihan, The Kinkaid School (TX)
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      TrackThe Student Experience
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What is mindfulness, why is it so popular, and how and why does it work? How do we cultivate a mindfulness practice for ourselves, our students, and our schools? How is mindfulness related and conducive to design thinking?
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    • Universal Values: Making Diversity Programming Accessible to All Areas of School Life

      304

      Find out how to creatively infuse diversity initiatives into the everyday life of a school using five qualities for success: creativity, ambition, universality, teamwork, and resilience. With examples of specific programs and practical steps, examine triumphs and failures on the path toward creating a welcoming, inclusive, and equitable school community.
      Presented ByRachael Flores and Carolyn Lewis, Episcopal High School (VA)
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      TrackThe Student Experience
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How does one lead or support diversity programs through an organic, unofficial, or unrecognized approach in an independent school? How can diversity work become integral to an institution’s mission and universal in its appeal to all constituents in a school community? Why does diversity work (and ideals like equity, inclusion, cultural awareness, dialogue facilitation, etc.) matter for independent schools?
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