Navigate Up
Sign In

One-Hour Workshops: Block 1

Block 1Thursday 8:00-9:00 AM

  • Communications and Advancement
    • Beyond the Myth of Saving Kids: Telling the True Value of Scholarship

      2002

      For too long in our fundraising and promotional efforts we have relied on the core myth of schools saving kids. This “us helping them” message can have a divisive and toxic effect on schoolhouse culture. Come hear one school’s efforts to change the story of scholarship - to claim the true impact that a diverse student body has on our community and educational mission.
      Presented ByErik Wilker and Elizabeth Grumbach, Moses Brown School (RI)
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can you tell a better scholarship story - one that creates equitable footing for all students in your school? Which tools are most effective in helping your school community embrace the elevating contributions of a diverse student body? How can your school avoid the dangerous pitfalls that can arise when talking about the relationship between diversity and scholarship?
      -
    • Collaborating with Public Schools on a Common Vision

      2003

      Independent schools and public schools often have the desire to collaborate but many times those efforts end in frustration. During this engaging and thought-provoking session led by Ken Kay, chief executive officer for EdLeader21, learn how independent and public school districts are working together on building a common vision of 21st century education.
      Presented ByKen Kay and Jon Gundry, EdLeader21 (AZ), Josh Brody, Sequoyah School (CA); Brett Jacobsen, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School (GA); Marsha Little, The Lovett School (GA)
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can independent and public schools work together? Why is a common vision so powerful in independent/public school cooperation? What are concrete areas where independent/public schools can cooperate? Why is this independent/public school cooperation so powerful?
      -
    • It Ain't the 90s Anymore! Understanding and Communicating International Trend Data

      2024

      In the late ‘90s, it was impossible to believe it would be difficult to enroll Korean students, or that Chinese students would soon comprise the majority of schools’ international enrollments. Better prepare to understand enrollment challenges related to the STEEP factors (social, technological, economic, environmental, and political) over which you have no control. Join us for a discussion of trends, opportunities and challenges.
      Presented ByAimee Gruber, Secondary School Admission Test Board (SSATB) and Francis Ryan, Rumsey Hall School (CT)
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhy are all of our international applicants from China? How are today's admission professionals recruiting international students? What does this mean for my school both long and short term?
      -
    • The Cart Before the Horse: The Story of School (or Program) Creation

      3000

      It’s hard enough to show the value of a program that already exists. How about one that doesn’t? Learn about Beacon Academy’s journey from idea in 2010 to opening in 2014. Be prepared to swap stories about your own struggles and triumphs when trying to bring innovation, program creation, and new concepts to established schools and communities.
      Presented ByKate Anderson, and Jeff Bell, Beacon Academy (IL)
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore What are the lessons we can all learn and apply from a founding school story? How do you market and set expectations for a program that doesn’t yet exist? How does this differ for families, donors, banks/lenders, real estate brokers, or the surrounding community? How do you prioritize to focus on attracting and retaining the best teacher talent? What role do autonomy and buy-in play in leadership development in a new school, both at the student and staff/faculty level?
      -
  • Governance
    • One School, Two Campuses: Opening and Operating a Second Campus Overseas

      2016

      What would you do if you had the opportunity to open a second campus halfway around the globe? In 2010, Chadwick School said "Yes!" to just such an invitation. Since then, Chadwick International School Songdo (South Korea) has grown to 1100 students PK - G12; our first class will graduate in June 2016. In this session, we will outline key benefits and successes as well as issues of admissions, personnel, school culture, curriculum, and finance.
      Presented ByTed Hill, Chadwick School (CA); Shelly Luke Wille, Chadwick International School (KOREA)
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhy would a school consider opening and operating a second campus in another country? What are the key issues or criteria to consider in evaluating such opportunities? What are critical do's and don't's if a school does decide to take on such an undertaking?
      -
    • Supporting Heads – Sustaining a Flourishing Leadership Partnership

      3003

      Sustaining a flourishing head–board partnership is crucial for the stability of a school. Boards can best support heads by understanding what their needs are to sustain them in the position long-term. Based on a survey of more than 250 heads and trustees, this session examines how trustees can best support their heads to form and nurture mutually beneficial relationships.
      Presented ByTekakwitha Pernambuco-Wise and Amy Ramsey, Sea Crest School (CA)
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat types of support do Heads most value from their Trustees? Do heads who lead different types of schools (K-8, 9-12, boarding, young, etc.) and at different stages in their headship need different types of support? Does the concept of head “support” have the same implications for heads as it does for trustees?
      -
    • Trailblazing a New Model for School Finance: One School's Journey Toward Net Revenue

      3001

      Hear the story of one school's journey toward developing a net revenue financial model. Hear from the head of school and trustees about lessons learned along the way, how they have changed their thinking on financial aid, and how they have experimented with alternative revenue sources to supplement income.
      Presented ByBradley Weaver and Katie Murphy, Sonoma Country Day School (CA)
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhat is net revenue budgeting? How does financial aid work within a net revenue model? What are unique opportunities for alternative revenue sources within participants' schools?
      -
    • Trustees and Heads Working for Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity

      3024

      Diversity, inclusion, and equity are governance responsibilities. In this working conversation, participants will learn about a grass-roots collaborative of diversity-committed trustees and heads, identify governance responsibilities for inclusion and equity, discuss cultural competency needs within boards, and explore effective practices for school leadership.
      Presented ByAlison Park, Blink Consulting, Alex Wong, Town School for Boys (CA), and Barre Fong, Katherine Delmar Burke School (CA)
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What responsibility and role do boards have in their schools’ commitment to diversity, inclusion, and equity? What are effective practices at the board level? What do boards and heads need in order to be leaders in diversity, inclusion, and equity?
      -
  • Leadership Development
    • Ahead of The Curve: Growing a Culture of Innovation at Your School

      2000

      Do you have people on your faculty doing amazing things? Are you an early adopter who sometimes feels out of place and alone among your colleagues? In this session, administrators will learn how to support the leaders among their faculty and engender a culture of risk taking in their schools. Innovative teachers will be inspired to continue to take risks and try new things, and learn where to go inside and outside their classrooms for support.
      Presented ByLiz Davis, Synapse School (CA), Karen Blumberg, The School at Columbia University (NY), Kim Sivick, PAIS, and Hadley Ferguson, The Edcamp Foundation (PA)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How do administrators create an atmosphere that is welcoming to innovators? How do administrators recognize, locate, and support the individuals who are taking risks and trying new things? How can innovative faculty find the support they need to continue doing great work?
      -
    • Developing Cultural and Global Competency Curriculum for Academic Leaders

      2004

      Recognizing that school leaders play a critical role in shaping institutional discourse around cultural and global competency, learn about one school’s year-long professional development sequence on this important topic. Participants will leave the session with a clear roadmap for initiating similar leadership-level conversation in their own schools.
      Presented ByAnne Graybeal and Marie Michael, The Blake School (MN)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore Why is it essential for school leadership to be culturally and globally competent? How can a school engage its institutional and academic leadership in ongoing professional development around cultural and global competency? What is one model for in-house professional development in cultural and global competency for school leadership?
      -
    • From Inspection to Reflection: A Journey from Top-down Evaluation to Instructional Coaching

      2007

      McLean Middle School embarked on an experiment, replacing top-down teacher evaluation with instructional coaching to improve instruction. Teachers used a professional growth rubric, met one-on-one with the instructional coach,  and chose skills to develop. After peer observations, teachers exchanged feedback. We were trailblazers; there was no turning back, and no end to this process of self-reflection and mutual support.
      Presented ByKate Rizzi, Robyn Wise, and David Roth, McLean School of Maryland (MD)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How does giving teachers the choice to set professional goals and providing instructional coaching improve their motivation to implement positive change in their teaching practices? Why is a skill-based, growth-oriented model superior to a one-time performance review and attendance at mass PD presentations? What is the impact on a school's culture when it moves from reliance on ineffective performance reviews toward becoming a learning community in which all members share, reflect upon, and learn from their successes and failures?
      -
    • Head of School as Storyteller in Chief

      2006

      Fellowship Workshop

      Great stories attract great families.  We decoded how NAIS Heads of School convey their value proposition. Join us as we pull back the curtain on telling outstanding stories. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByArvind Grover, Grace Church School (NY); Eric Marner, Gilman School (MD); Steve McManus, Friends School of Baltimore (MD); Joey Menendez, Westminster School of Augusta (GA); John Rigney, Hyde School (CT)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
    • Leadership + Design Lab: Seeking 21st Century Talent

      2010

      ​Want to foster students’ 21st century skills – creativity, teamwork, critical thinking? Start by seeking and developing those traits in teachers and leaders. Partner with Silicon Valley HR pros and use playful design thinking to explode and reimagine school hiring practices, from recruiting to interviewing and ongoing professional development.
      Presented ByMatt Glendinning, Moses Brown School (RI) and Carla Silver, Leadership+Design
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can we overcome the hidden assumptions that shape (and limit) traditional hiring practices? What can educators learn from Silicon Valley about recruiting 21st-century talent? How can rethinking hiring help your school carry out its mission?
      -
    • Measuring School Success: Determining the Right Indicators for Your 21st Century School

      2006

      Fellowship Workshop

      Explore the factors that different types of schools and school leaders consider as they try to assess whether or not they are accomplishing their missions. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented BySusan Dempf, Carrollton School of the Sacred Heart (FL); Michael Dibbert, Saint John School (MA); Rebecca Jackman, Commonwealth School (MA); Heather Mock, Alexander Dawson School (CO); Benjamin Rous, Hampton Roads Academy (VA); Deborah Strainge, Tower School (MA)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
  • Management
    • Making Sense of Technology in Independent Schools and Selecting the Right One for You

      2011

      SIS, LMS, PLP...What? If you're not entirely clear about technology terms and applications, this is the session for you. This session will provide you and your staff with a consistent understanding of ed tech. You'll leave this session feeling confident when evaluating different technologies for your school or classroom that you've selected the best fit technology for your needs.
      Presented ByKawai Lai, NAIS
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore How do I make sense of technology in my school? How do I make decisions on what technologies my school needs? What technologies are other schools using? What works? What doesn't?
      -
    • Strategic Engagement in Online Learning - Five Case Studies

      2020

      This workshop will present and discuss five case studies of schools that are strategically engaged in online learning. Commonalities among these schools will emerge, including that they: have leaders who put online learning on the table as a solution to challenges around time, space, or staffing; and eventually move to a mindset of leveraging online resources to propel teaching and learning forward within the school.
      Presented ByBradford Rathgeber, Online School for Girls (MD)
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How do schools start to engage in online learning? What pathways do schools take as the embed online learning into the curriculum of the school? What commonalities exist between strategically engaged schools?
      -
    • What's the POINT? Learn How to Translate the Stories of Your School from One Group to Another

      3018

      By learning to act as a POINT person, or "Point Of Information Transfer," the administrator will reframe his or her role as a translator of stories that resonate with the school mission, rather than simply a problem solver. This will empower community members to solve their own problems.
      Presented ByBenedict Chant, Margaret Metz, The Mandell School (NY)
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhy do the good people I work with not understand each other? How can I sustain my workload and commitment when I am being pulled in all directions? How can I best serve the mission of the school?
      -
  • The Classroom Experience
    • Instructional Rounds and Pedagography: Designs for a Learning Map Revolution

      2008

      Three instructional leaders and educational designers from Mount Vernon Presbyterian School (MVPS) facilitate a session about ways to build collaborative teaching capacity and map a school’s pedagogical and learning ecosystem. At MVPS they are innovating instructional rounds processes and inventing pedagography - a new strategic practice for mapping and enhancing one’s own school.
      Presented ByBo Adams, Shelley Clifford, and Chip Houston, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School (GA)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How might we create a school culture hungry for feedback, immersed in the growth mindset, and engaged as networked cohorts of learning teams using observation, feedback, and coaching to enhance pedagogical practices for the ultimate benefit of improved student learning? How might we use design thinking and systems thinking to innovate professional learning practices in school? How might we systemically map and visualize our school’s pedagogical ecosystem like Lewis and Clark mapped the Louisiana purchase or like Google is mapping the Earth?
      -
    • Is Neurodiversity in Your Diversity Plan? Don’t Turn Away the Next da Vinci or Charles Schwab.

      2009

      While it is nearly undisputed that schools benefit from having racial, cultural, and ethnic diversity, there is little discussion of the value added with neurodiversity. Unfortunately, the negative labels associated with learning-disabled students overshadow the unique contributions they can make in their schools if given the opportunity. Remediation and accommodation are the keys to unlocking their talent.
      Presented ByRachel Whilby, John Russell, and Jonathan Rosenshine, The Windward School (NY)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhat research-based teaching strategies are effective in supporting learning-disabled students? What is neurodiversity? How do learning-disabled students add to the richness of their school community? How do properly remediated learning-disabled students fare in the mainstream as compared to their “neurotypical” peers? What lasting impact do research-based strategies have on future learning?
      -
    • Reading, Collaborating, and Innovating for Sustainability

      2018

      Two middle school English teachers introducing nonfiction reading with Michael Pollan’s Omnivore’s Dilemma are joined by two social studies colleagues in piloting an interdisciplinary approach to the most pressing problem of our time: the sustainability of our planet.
      Presented BySusan Davis, Cate Waidyatilleka, Kimi Frith, and R. Bonning, Iolani School (HI)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow can teachers who embrace innovation spark new approaches at their schools? What are the lessons learned from crossing subject-area boundaries at a traditional independent school to embrace the problems of the future? How can small steps made for students on the ground build towards a bigger impact for our schools, our communities, and our world?
      -
    • Strategies for Sustaining Innovation When Hype Turns to Gripe

      2022

      Despite organizational inertia and competing priorities, how can meaningful, lasting innovation be realized? Learn from The Urban School of San Francisco’s recent innovations in advancing blended learning, adopting a new LMS and developing an engineering and design program. Assess your school’s relationship to disruptive innovation and strategize for when enthusiasm for a new idea gives way to skepticism and disillusionment.
      Presented ByKelsey Vrooman, Riley Maddox, and Geoff Ruth, The Urban School of San Francisco (CA)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore What are the major disruptive forces of innovation in independent schools today? How can school leaders help grow and sustain innovative practices or programs in their school?  How have other institutions responded to challenges in implementation of new programs?
      -
  • The Student Experience
    • Beyond Sustainability Toward an Integrated and Regenerative Ecological Approach to School

      2001

      This workshop will examine practical ways schools can create campuses that reach beyond sustainability toward resiliency and regeneration in the face of changing ecological, social, and economic conditions.  The workshop focuses on three main topics: facilities, mission, curriculum design, and their integration will be at the heart of the presentation. Specific examples from The Hotchkiss School's environmental program will be used.
      Presented ByJoshua Hahn, The Hotchkiss School (CT)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How can a school align mission, facilities, and curriculum? How can independent schools lead for public purpose? How do we alleviate disconnects between what we teach and what we do at school? How can a school's staff be as integral to learning as a school's faculty? How do we live well together in a place?
      -
    • Mindful Insights into Student SEL Development

      2012

      Current educational and scientific research suggest noncognitive/SEL traits, such as grit, conscientiousness, and curiosity, factor into a student’s academic and life success. While we explicitly teach cognitive skills, noncognitive, social-emotional, or soft skills have been addressed less formally. Gain best practices to measure and incorporate SEL into the overall school curriculum and culture.
      Presented BySarah Savage and Dave Clune, Educational Records Bureau; Anabel Jensen, Synapse School (CA); and Denise Pope, Stanford School of Education
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat are the most important non-cognitive/SEL traits for student academic, career, and life success? How do we measure and support the development of these traits within the school curriculum and culture as a whole? How does growth in these important traits impact student success throughout their academic careers as well as their lives outside of school?
      -
    • Turning a Blind Eye to Bullying?

      3002

      Participants will learn about behaviors that constitute bullying (including cyber-bullying), hazing, and harassment; the differences between them; the impact of the behavior; the legal liability; and methods for both combating the behavior and instituting policies and programs that may help the school avoid liability.
      Presented ByCandice Pinares-Baez, Fisher & Phillips, LLP, and Diane Jones, Saint Andrew's School (FL)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat policies and procedures should be in place to combat bullying? What are proper and improper communications in varying bullying scenarios? What are the differences between bullying, hazing, and harassment?
      -
    • What's the Race to be Done with Race?

      3020

      At a time when college classes are more diverse than ever and one out of every four college students say that racism is no longer a problem in America, why do so many people of color feel so disenfranchised and why do we see such startling evidence on both social and journalistic media that race matters as much as ever? The national conversation about race still sputters with uncertainty and a lack of conviction. Learn what independent schools can do to stem the tide of avoidance and prepare our institutions and students to lead the charge toward an inclusive America.
      Presented ByRobert Greene, Jones and Associates Consulting, Inc.
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What makes race such a difficult topic to engage in our independent schools? Given the social changes in the last 50 years, is race still as relevant a factor in social relationships as it was during the Civil Rights Movement or have class, region, sexual orientation, and other identifiers superseded race in importance and impact? Most importantly, as the news cycle in the last year has featured numerous stories that involve racial differences and the nation has struggled to open and engage an honest and consistent dialogue about the levels of racism that are still prevalent in American society, what can independent schools do to help shape the narrative and prepare our students to be leaders in the world?
      -
​​​​
 

 Highlighted Sponsor

 
 

 From Twitter...