Navigate Up
Sign In

One-Hour Workshops: Block 3

Block 3Thursday 2:45-3:45 PM
  • Communications and Advancement
    • Full STEAM Ahead: Donors as Engines of Innovation

      2009

      The US will need one million college grads trained in STEM fields in the next decade. Independent secondary schools have an important role to play in developing innovative thinkers and providing students tools to pursue careers in science, technology, and engineering. Utilizing case studies from current STEM/STEAM capital campaigns, this session will equip attendees to engage donors and take their programs to the next level.
      Presented ByRick Happy and Dennis Collins, CCS; Nancy Kehoe, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA); Nanci Kauffman, Castilleja School (CA); Rob Lake, Collingwood School (CANADA)
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat are donor attitudes and giving trends toward STEM/STEAM programs? What are some unique challenges secondary schools face in messaging the value of their STEM/STEAM programs? How can we ensure new funding opportunities align with our school’s vision and strategic plan? What kind of strategies can we develop to engage donors, prospects, and volunteers to propel our school’s STEM/STEAM programming?
      -
    • How to Get an “A” in School Board Fundraising

      2016

      Get the training and tools needed to effectively engage your board in its most important challenge: fundraising. Learn how to establish and communicate specific expectations, provide structure and assign responsibilities. Topics covered include: the board development plan, board job descriptions, the role of the development committee, creating sub-committees with specific job descriptions and assignments, and more.
      Presented ByDaniel Neel, The Fundraising Resource Group
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow do I effectively communicate specific expectations for board members? How do I provide the appropriate structure and training to empower board members? How do I effectively engage board members to be successful in fundraising for the school?
      -
  • Governance
    • Board Governance: Scandals, Crises, and Other Serious Issues – What’s the Board’s Role?

      2024

      There is no question an effective board is an essential factor of any successful independent school, and that the board must work in tandem with the school’s administration on various matters. What is the board’s role in crises and other serious issues?  Where are the lines drawn?  How does the board square fiduciary responsibility with overstepping into operational matters?  Have the lines changed over the years?  Should they?
      Presented BySuzanne Bogdan, Fisher & Phillips, LLP, Debra Wilson, National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS), and Steven Piltch, The Shipley School (PA)
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelAdvanced
      -
      ExploreWhen is it proper for the board to become involved in school affairs and to what extent? What are the steps in making a case for change regarding the board's involvement? What proactive steps can heads take in crisis management to keep control?
      -
    • Board Structure as a Catalyst for Innovation

      2003

      With Berwick Academy's financial planning, oversight mechanisms, and head of school functioning at a high level, the board undertook a detailed review and subsequent overhaul of its traditional committee structures.  This has been a catalyst for significant progress on the school’s long range plan that focuses on building an innovative educational institution for the 21st century and beyond.
      Presented ByAmy Smucker, Gregory Schneider, and Matthew Friel, Berwick Academy (ME)
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelAdvanced
      -
      Explore How can a board chair lead fundamental change to traditional governance structures?   How can a board truly be a catalyst for institutional evolution beyond writing checks? What are the costs and challenges in making structural changes to both board oversight as well as administrative structures?
      -
    • Head of School Employment Contracts: Analysis and Examples

      2014

      This workshop aims to explain the key parts of a head of school employment agreement..  Topics will cover: examples of  key contract provisions, how to do the research on what to expect from your school, strategy, the role of the school's search consultant, and how to keep the negotiations in perspective with your family.  Questions and participation welcomed.
      Presented ByTerrence Briggs, Bowditch & Dewey, LLP, and Ronald Cino, Worcester Academy (MA)
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreDoes every Head employment contract look alike? Do they all have the same general terms and benefits? If I get offered one thing and it is not something that I want or need, can I switch it for something else? How do I pick out the important parts of a contract that may be a dozen pages long?
      -
      Related Documents
      2016-Briggs (PDF, 489 KB)
  • Leadership Development
    • Beating Tuition Dependence With Alternative Revenue Sources

      2008

      Fellowship Workshop

      Financial sustainability depends on breaking dependence on tuition dollars.  Find out how schools are getting creative with alternate income streams to increase affordability. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByQuincey Grieve, St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School (VA); Trisha Medeiros, Stuart Country Day School (NJ); William Morris, Choate Rosemary Hall (CT); Kristen Ring, Bayside Academy (AL); Jennifer White, The Emery/Weiner School (TX)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
    • Brand Clarity is Key to Your Leadership and to Your School’s Success

      2004

      Brand clarity ultimately involves creativity but first requires objective analysis, rigorous market research, and frank reflection on your value proposition. This session describes a strategic approach to developing a competitive brand identity. It offers insight into the bold leadership it takes to get there while navigating the charged issues of culture and tradition.
      Presented ByBen Edwards, Art & Science Group (NC) and Scott Erickson, The Phillips Brooks School (CA)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelAdvanced
      -
      Explore How can you be a trailblazer leading your school towards brand clarity? In leading your school’s brand clarity process, what risks should you consider taking and what pitfalls and potential mistakes will you encounter along the way? What are the most notable rewards and improvements that result from a school’s brand clarity?
      -
    • Cultural Competency for Graduates of the Future: are we doing enough?

      2008

      Fellowship Workshop

      Cultural competence (CC) is considered a core principle of necessary value in independent schools. We present an analysis of the impact of CC from the leadership perspective. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByElizabeth Ashforth, Marlborough School (CA); Brenda Crawley, Sandy Spring Friends School (MD); Donna Lindner, The Agnes Irwin School (PA); Kimberly Ridley, Gordon School (RI); Mónica Ruiz-Meléndez, Westtown School (PA); Todd Zehner, St. Johns Country Day School (FL); Martha Cunningham, Maret School (DC)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
    • Exploring the Edges: Stories of Collaborations that Rethink Time, Space and Place

      2007

      What does it mean to collaborate by rethinking time, space, and place? Does everyone have to be in the same place? How is collaboration defined in a truly blended learning environment? This session will explore innovation and collaboration through the lens of time, place, and space. We’ll reflect on three unique models of collaboration and what it means to collaborate by rethinking time, space, and place.
      Presented ByAmy Hollinger, Emily Hamlin, and Susan Fine, Global Online Academy (WA); Beth Calderone, The Blake School (MN)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow can rethinking collaboration in terms of time, space, and place promote innovation in your school? What small steps can leaders take toward nurturing new models of collaboration? What resources are available to support this evolution?
      -
    • G​rowing in Self-Knowledge: Storytelling and Personal Testimony with Your School and Self

      2010

      Our life stories shape our leadership. Join us for an interactive SEED-inspired session where we will delve into our own stories and the ways in which they affect our faculty, students, school culture and our own daily work in schools. Listen to the journeys of others, share your own and learn how storytelling and serial testimony can be catalysts for satisfying and systemic work.
      Presented ByAshley Marshall, The Lovett School (GA) and Peggy McIntosh, The Wellesley Centers for Women and the National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore How does some aspect of my own life outside of school particularly inform the kind of leadership I show in class or in school? How do I feel that my stories could affect faculty, students, and the wider school culture in a positive way? Is there anything systemic in my background that impedes my attention to myself as a confident educator ,​trailblazer, catalyst, or person facing calamities?
      -
    • Green Ribbon Schools: The Story of Environmentally Sustainable Schools

      2012

      In 2015 the U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools program recognized six NAIS schools.  Leaders from these exemplary schools will present their innovative achievements.  We will describe the process to apply for Green Ribbon Schools recognition and explain how this program develops more sustainable facilities, operations, and curriculum.
      Presented ByPaul Chapman, Prospect Sierra School (CA); Lucinda Lee Katz, Marin Country Day School (CA); Tamar Cunha, Greens Farms Academy (CT); Paul Stellato, Princeton Day School (NJ); John Farber, Old Trail School (OH); and Dan Frank, The Steward School (VA)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What is the Green Ribbon Schools program?  What are the characteristics of green, environmentally sustainable schools?  And how do the NAIS Green Ribbon Schools exemplify best practices for our member schools to follow?
      -
    • It’s A Girl(s Charter School)!: The Story of Birthing a Public-Private Partnership

      2020

      Roland Park Country School, in collaboration with The Bryn Mawr School, created the Lillie May Carroll Jackson Charter School as a catalyst for educational change in Baltimore. Discover the story of LMCJCS, hear from school leaders and the inaugural class of scholars, and discuss the big risks and big rewards on this ground-breaking brand of public-private partnership.
      Presented ByShannon Montague and Peter Metsopolous, The Bryn Mawr School (MD); Carla Spawn-van Berkum, Roland Park Country School (MD); and Laurel Freedman, Lillie May Carroll Jackson Charter School (MD)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore How and why is it important for  independent school communities to cultivate and sustain interest in building partnerships with their local school districts? How do public-private partnerships inspire connections and build community? What’s the path out of our independent school silos individually or as an institution?
      -
    • The Professional Development Process as a Means to Institutionalizing Diversity Goals

      3001

      This workshop focuses on how professional development for faculty, staff, and administrators can institutionalize diversity goals at independent schools. Learn how intentional planning of professional development results in cultural shifts where responsibility for diversity initiatives shifts from that of the individual to that of the institution by providing opportunities for leadership to all members of the school community.
      Presented ByDavid Duane, Tete Cobblah, and Gerard Ward, The Fenn School (MA)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat role does professional development play in fostering growth and leadership as a means to creating institutional change? What are the catalysts and leverage points that schools can use to persist and overcome pitfalls and calamities as they satisfy institutional goals? How does a school intentionally plan and create cultural shifts so that the responsibility of diversity initiatives shift from that of the individual to that of the institution?
      -
    • Two Brains Are Better Than One! The New Normal - Creating Effective Head/Assistant Head Collaboration

      3002

      The expectations of heads are daunting. New heads are full of hope but challenged by the realities of the position. Rising stars, the future leaders, need mentorship. Authentic, powerful head/assistant head of school teams are the right solution. Through case studies, we will explore creating relationships to navigate successful collaboration and offer a model of healthy, fulfilling, effective teams.
      Presented ByMatthew Stuart, The Caedmon School (NY) and Honor Taft, Gill St Bernard's School (NJ)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelAdvanced
      -
      Explore How do you thoughtfully and respectfully define and balance the exact roles of head and assistant head of school? Is it always “the head’s decision?” How do you continue to build a successful partnership, staying attuned throughout the ongoing process? How do you define and communicate your roles to the entire school community?
      -
  • Management
    • Developing a Data-Driven Strategy for School Improvement

      2006

      How do you incorporate parent, student, and faculty feedback to improve school programs, retention, and reputation? Sorting among different anecdotes and perceptions can be challenging. Market research techniques that identify what matters most can help schools focus on improvement conversations and invest limited resources for the greatest impact.
      Presented ByMonique DeVane, The College Preparatory School (CA); Beruria Novich, The Pacific Consulting Group; and Sabina McMahon, The Thacher School (CA)
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow do leading edge market research techniques provide value compared to traditional parent/student satisfaction surveys or stakeholder discussions?   What are some examples of how research findings have informed changes in school program or practices?   What are some of the longitudinal benefits of sustained market research work over time?
      -
    • Independence at Independent Schools: Thinking About Organizational Structure

      2018

      How can an independent school maintain its independent spirit while ensuring accountability and excellence across the board?  How do schools manage the tensions between teacher autonomy and teacher independence?  In this session, two school administrators will discuss how to encourage distributed leadership, stronger supervising, and greater accountability in order to improve teaching and learning.
      Presented ByBlake Spraggins, Marjo Talbott, and Nicholas Michalopoulos, Maret School (DC)
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat should schools think about when considering organizational structure?  How can schools distribute leadership effectively?  How can schools increase accountability while still allowing teacher independence?
      -
    • Marketing Research: Why It Matters for Today's Independent Schools

      2000

      Many NAIS schools are experiencing enrollment challenges and must have a strong understanding of how they are perceived in the market. We will explore the value of marketing research and the key issues that a head should consider before starting the process. What is your school’s reputation with prospective families and how do you design an effective study?
      Presented ByNeil Mufson, The Country School (MD), Jonathan Oleisky, Kalix Communications, LLC, and Jeff Henn, Consultant
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhat's the value of market research to a comprehensive re-branding campaign? How do you design an effective marketing research study for an independent school? How does third party objectivity play an important role in this process?
      -
    • Use of Participant Agreements - Releases and Related Issues

      3022

      As a school, do you have parents and/or students sign an agreement containing a description of the activities students will undertake, both on and off campus, whether in the US or internationally? Does this agreement endeavor to include certain legal protections for the school?  This workshop will cover legal and practical issues associated with use of written participation agreements with school families and highlight the value in using these documents as informational, risk management and legal tools.  We will identify key agreement components and provide examples of current case law to discuss specific issues affecting schools and other organizations that undertake active programming. Significant issues include: dealing with minors, releases, acknowledgment and assumption of risks, the inter-relationship of various school agreements; e-signatures; and unique state laws and legal doctrines.
      Presented ByCatherine Hansen-Stamp, Attorney
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhy it is important to work with informed legal counsel to develop (or revise) your participant agreement, consistent with existing school agreements and information, and consistent with applicable state law and other relevant considerations? Why it is important to understand issues associated with crafting a participant agreement that involves minor participants? Why it is important to consider (with informed legal counsel) the use and implementation of electronic forms and associated compliance with e-sign laws, if the school is planning to have participants electronically sign the participant agreement?
      -
  • The Classroom Experience
    • Begin at the Beginning: Implementing Design Thinking

      2001

      Most schools have approached design thinking by building a lab and then creating a program. Francis Parker School took a different approach: we crafted a design thinking vision, and then implemented the vision via lesson development. Now we are building physical lab spaces that support our vision. We will share the highs and lows of our journey and share how you can replicate a vision-oriented design thinking paradigm at your school. See more at www.francisparker.org/designthinking
      Presented ByLaurynn Evans, Sergina Bach, and Laurie Brae, Francis Parker School (CA)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat are some specific, tangible ways that we can deliver design thinking lessons in all curricular areas at all grade levels (lesson plan ideas)? How might we better connect classroom learning with our design lab? What other possibilities are out there to implement design thinking besides spending money on a lab space?
      -
    • Global Issues Network (GIN)

      2011

      Join us for this workshop to learn about how your students can engage with GIN projects and conferences.  A GIN project is focused on working to address global issues in each school's direct community and it can focus on issues that need to be worked on in the school community. Attendees will also learn about attending and hosting a GIN conference and engaging students on work related to global problem-solving.
      Presented ByIoana Wheeler, NAIS; Linda Sills and Ashley Sills, Global Issues Network; Sophia Clark and Lily Mansfield, International High School, San Francisco (CA); Robert Landau, HAIS
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can students become global problem solvers and agents of change? How can students engage in events related to global issues? How can teachers support students interested in taking on a leadership role in global problem-solving?
      -
    • Maker Magic: Middle School “Maker” History Projects Inspire Lifelong Curiosity

      2022

      Learn what you need to start effective hands-on making projects in the history classroom. “Maker projects” inspire budding historians and foster life-long learners. Leave with clear understanding of how projects work, specific ideas for the classroom teacher with or without a dedicated makerspace, and a keen understanding of how “making” in history develops curiosity.
      Presented ByHeather Pang, Eugenie Paick, and Laura Docter, Castilleja School (CA)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow does “making” enhance the (history) curriculum, inspire students (especially girls) to think across disciplines, and promote students’ intellectual growth? How do we develop, iterate, and coordinate our maker projects within a collaborative teaching environment? What are resources and specific projects for getting started in the classroom, even if you don’t have a dedicated maker space?
      -
    • The AltSchool Story: Super Powering Educators To Transform Education

      3000

      AltSchool was founded in 2013 by educators, technologists, entrepreneurs, and parents who believe technology coupled with empathy has the power to transform education. In this panel discussion and audience Q&A, a teacher, a parent, an engineer, and a student will join AltSchool’s founder to describe how startup culture nurtures innovation and rapid iteration in our 17 classrooms in San Francisco, Palo Alto, and Brooklyn.
      Presented ByCarolyn Wilson and Max Ventilla, AltSchool, Inc (CA)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore Why did engineers, entrepreneurs, designers, parents, and educators come together to found AltSchool, a network of micro-schools? How do educators, parents, engineers, designers, and product managers work together to build products and design practices which improve the school experience for students, parents, and educators? How can technology and start-up culture empower educators  to deliver personalized education in diverse learning communities?
      -
  • The Student Experience
    • A Tale of Two Schools: Catalysts and Calamities of Creating a School Policy to Ban the N-Word

      3024

      This interactive session will highlight the challenges, approaches and other factors that two schools [William Penn Charter School (PA) and Friends Academy (NY)] considered in their creation and implementation of a viable and effective school policy to ban the N-word and other derogatory language. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions, share, and outline their own action plans against the N-word in their schools.
      Presented ByShanelle Robinson, Friends Academy (NY) and Antonio Williams, William Penn Charter School (PA)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore How can schools create a school policy to address use of the N-word and other derogatory language? How can schools address offensive and/or derogatory language use in educational curriculum and/or by students on social media? What are the advantages and challenges of creating and implementing such a policy?
      -
    • Blazing Trails with Charger Trails: Creating Confident, Contributing Community Members

      2002

      Looking for ideas to create a sustainable program that develops social and emotional life skills necessary for individual and community wellbeing? Join us as we share the story of Charger Trails, a dynamic, faculty-created program that expands and enriches the total education of our students. Return to your schools better equipped to enhance programming that empowers students to become confident, contributing community members.
      Presented ByMarti Jenkins and Kelly Wiebe, Cary Academy (NC)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow do faculty create meaningful topics and self-reflective activities? How do schools foster ownership and empower expertise amongst faculty?  How do schools involve parents in supporting their children in these programs?
      -
    • Courageous Conversations: Advancing School Engagement around Race and Equity

      3020

      To unleash the rich potential of diverse perspectives, says scholar Cornel West, “We must be prepared to enter the conversation and be prepared to be changed by it.” Learn about a strategic, multi-year process, involving frameworks and protocols designed for large-scale institutional transformation, that is yielding results at The Dalton School and The Spence School.
      Presented ByEllanor (Bodie) N Brizendine and Susan Parker, The Spence School (NY); Glenn Singleton, Pacific Educational Group; Caroline Blackwell, NAIS; Ellen Stein and Lisa Waller, The Dalton School (NY)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow do you engage a whole school in conversations about race? How do you build school-wide capacity to capitalize on the richness of different perspectives and to develop equity of voice and presence? How do you integrate equity and inclusivity as part of the whole?
      -
    • Praise, Perfection, and Other Inhibitors to Girls' Confidence: How One School Is Changing Its Culture

      2005

      Research indicates that girls who succeed in the classroom paradoxically struggle with confidence once they enter the workplace. In our efforts to close this confidence gap, we will share strategies for how we are changing classroom practices as well as the culture of our school to address five primary inhibitors to girls’ confidence: perfectionism, fear of failure, sensitivity to criticism, the language of self-doubt, and comparison.
      Presented ByArmistead Lemon, Jess Hill, Jenny Jervis, Adam Wilsman, Katy Bowers, Buffy Baker, and Maddie Waud, Harpeth Hall School (TN)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhat is the latest research on girls and confidence, and how do these issues manifest themselves in the classroom, and later, in the workplace? What can we do as faculty and administrators to mitigate the major inhibitors to girls' confidence, namely perfectionism, fear of failure, sensitivity to criticism, the language of self-doubt, and comparison?  How are we educating our faculty, alumnae, and our parent community in order to shift the culture of our school?
      -
    • Responding to Claims of Bullying

      3018

      When parents or students complain of bullying, how should schools respond?  What is required to ensure that schools are protecting themselves from lawsuits and the students from harm?  This presentation will take participants through several case studies and an interactive discussion that will reveal exactly what is required in response to claims of bullying.
      Presented ByMichael Blacher, Liebert Cassidy Whitmore; James Busby, The Buckley School (CA)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat is required of a school in the face of a claim of bullying?  Who should conduct an investigation into a claim of bullying?  What information may be shared at the conclusion of the investigation?
      -
    • Youth Sharing Their Inspiration Globally: Bring TEDxYouthDay to Your School

      3003

      This workshop will provide step-by-step resources on how to apply for a license, what the requirements are for participation and what tasks must be completed in order to organize a TEDxYouthDay event.
      Presented ByJill Brown, Albuquerque Academy (NM) and Larry Kahn, The Bay School of San Francisco (CA)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow do you organize a TEDxYouthDay event? What leadership and volunteer opportunities does this provide for your students? How can this event help market your school?
      -
​​​​
 

 Highlighted Sponsor

 
 

 From Twitter...