Navigate Up
Sign In

One-Hour Workshops: Block 4

Block 4Friday 8:00-9:00 AM
  • Communications and Advancement
    • Diversity and Inclusion in Independent School Development

      2002

      How can schools maintain a sense of inclusiveness with their development efforts in the face of pressures to bring in philanthropic dollars? Through case studies, participants will gain insight into independent school fundraising and leave with an understanding of how to structure a more inclusive development operation.
      Presented ByTiffani Harris, William Penn Charter School (PA); Alexis Wright, Bank Street School for Children (NY); and David Smith, Allen-Stevenson School (NY)
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelAdvanced
      -
      Explore How can schools maintain a sense of inclusiveness with their development efforts in the face of pressures to bring in philanthropic dollars? If your goal is to raise money, can you find alternate ways to do this while being inclusive? How can you avoid sensitive issues around race, class, and gender in your fundraising program?
      -
    • Now, More Than Ever, Schools Need to THINK and ACT Like a Brand.

      2010

      Schools need to think and act like a brand. Now, more than ever, schools must define their brand story and purpose to stand out in an educational environment that is more competitive than ever. Learn from real world examples why answering the question “who are we?” is key to galvanizing everyone at your school, elevating brand recognition and reputation, and providing the foundation for enduring success. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/fxmkh58ruf9qt5o/AACFDFfoT9d1p9hSmnryOgyRa?oref=e
      Presented ByBrett Shevack, Brand Initiatives Group and Donna Kennedy, The Gillen Brewer School (NY)
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelAdvanced
      -
      ExploreWhy, more than ever, do schools need to think and act like a brand? How should schools go about answering the question, “Who are we?”? How can schools activate their brand positioning once they create it?
      -
    • What Stories Do These Scores Tell?

      3003

      Statistics and storytelling are often thought of as separate and disconnected. This session will explore how to blend statistics and storytelling to create more effective narratives that reach their intended audience(s) on both rational and emotional levels. Participants can expect to see case studies of quantitative data storytelling and insights into how to use quantitative data to develop unique independent school messages.
      Presented ByNick Standlea, Test Prep Gurus; Hector Martinez, The Webb Schools (CA); Alice Cotti, Polytechnic School (CA); Deren Finks, Cranbrook Schools (MI)
      -
      TrackCommunications and Advancement
      -
      LevelAdvanced
      -
      Explore How can independent schools best make use of their institutional data to create unique, one-of-a-kind institutional stories?  How is quantifiable data such as GPA and test scores best supported by qualitative measures such as essays, strength of curriculum, course selection, and letters of recommendation to create powerful student-narratives that positively impact college admissions outcomes? In the landscape of independent schools, what are the short-term and long-term competitive advantages of using hard, quantifiable data to support institutional stories?
      -
  • Governance
    • Before and After a Search for a Head of School: How to Maximize Successful Outcomes!

      2000

      A head of school search ushers in change and transition.  A search is both daunting and exciting, and affects the entire school community. Learn how preparing for a search before beginning the process, and how supporting the new head after the “search” is concluded maximizes positive, long term outcomes.
      Presented ByDouglas Cummings and Jayne Geiger, Educators' Collaborative, LLC
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What steps should be taken by the board before the search begins to maximize a successful search? How can a school create a transition that maximizes the new head’s adjustment and success? What are the roles and responsibilities of the board, the senior leadership, and the community before and after search?
      -
    • Families First Workshop: Stories About the Power of Diversity from Diverse Heads and their Spouses: Part 1

      Alcove 2A

      ​In the first session of this tw-part workshop, three diverse heads of school and their spouses will tell their stories about rising to first-family positions. They will discuss the issues they considered before deciding to lead their schools, the characteristics they looked for in their boards, the roles their spouses play at their institutions, and the rewards of being a diverse leader.
      Presented ByDarryl Ford, William Penn Charter School (PA); Gail Sullivan, Monica M. Gillespie, and John K. Gillespie, Saint Mary's School (NC); Ronni McCaffrey, Graland Country Day School (CO); Barbara Frank
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
    • Qualities Most Desired and Needed in the Board Chair

      2011

      This session is for heads and board members aspiring to board leadership. They will hear about 15 qualities of successful board chairs and the research and anecdotal evidence that support why these qualities are critical. The goals are for heads and trustees to learn how to spot and vet talented chair candidates and for trustees to broaden their leadership skill set.
      Presented ByJohn Littleford, Littleford & Associates
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhy are these 15 traits so important in a board chair candidate and what do they have in common? What is the head’s role in the selection of the board chair? What is the role of the committee on trustees?
      -
    • Strategic Plan Accountability: Evaluating the Old to Prepare for the New

      2018

      Strategic planning must be more than goal-setting and action steps; it needs to become a core component of institutional accountability, both setting the agenda and clarifying the responsibilities for school leadership.  Learn how one school added an innovative process to formally evaluate the achievements of its current plan before launching its next planning cycle.
      Presented ByCarrie Snyder and Christian Talbot, Malvern Preparatory School (PA) and Jonathan Martin, Consultant
      -
      TrackGovernance
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How can strategic planning become a better process for enhancing institutional and leadership accountability and results? How can schools better prepare for the next round of strategic planning by thoroughly and formally evaluating the status and completion of its previous plan? How can schools use outside expertise for formal program evaluation that lends insight into the future direction of the school?
      -
  • Leadership Development
    • “A Badger, a Porcupine, a Dormouse and a Sloth All Walk Into a Job Interview…”

      3020

      Although we have the capacity, we seldom measure the factors that actually cause most new hire failures. This workshop will present a model that uses the latest assessment tools to look inside candidates’ heads BEFORE you hire them. This sequence of steps can boost hiring accuracy from 14% to nearly 90%. The session will include a pragmatic mindset, relevant examples, good humor, and minimal but very helpful handouts.
      Presented BySteve Chapman, Broad Reach Strategies
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelAdvanced
      -
      Explore How do a person’s behavior style, motivators, soft-skill competencies, and clarity of worldview let us predict their potential for success and how can these be measured BEFORE you offer a contract?  Why is it so common that an educator with huge success at a very similar school can arrive here and do so poorly?  How can this process be used to nurture a "socially intelligent" school culture and foster meaningful collaboration?
      -
    • Business Concepts: No longer the 'Dirty Words' in Education

      2005

      Fellowship Workshop

      Schools can no longer afford to view "branding", "clients", and "bottom-line" as dirty words.  Demographics, rising tuition, and increased competition make it imperative for school leaders to understand and use these concepts to maximize institutional capacity. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByLise Charlier, Severn School (MD); Michelle Dowling, Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart (NJ); La Vina Lowery, Menlo School (CA); Jennifer Rao, Garrison Forest School (MD); Craig Williamson, Chadwick International (SOUTH KOREA); Frances Hoover, The Philadelphia School (PA)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
    • From Content to Context: PD for the Future Independent School

      2005

      Fellowship Workshop

      A vibrant independent school in the future must prepare faculty in six key areas to help today’s “complicated” learners succeed. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByJeannine Clarke, St. Margaret's Episcopal School (CA); Claire Hornung-Smith, St. Andrews (FL); Susanne Johnson, Barnesville School of Arts & Sciences (MD); Craig Tredenick, All Saints' Episcopal School (TX); Derrick Willard, Providence Day School (NC); Polly Williams, The Galloway School (GA)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
    • Herstory: Behind, in Front of, Next to Every Female Leader, There is a...

      2007

      As we understand the need for capacity and pipelines for female leadership roles in schools, we feel it is important to adequately describe our roles as women in leadership and encourage, celebrate, and cultivate the future and current leaders within our communities. Strategic timing and calculated risk taking are critical to having more female leaders take the leap into such roles.
      Presented ByPenny Bach Evins, St. Paul's School for Girls (MD); Stephanie Balmer, Harpeth Hall School (TN); Ann Klotz, Laurel School (OH); Tekakwitha Pernambuco-Wise, Sea Crest School (CA)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore What does it take to feel and be successful as a female leader? Whether single, married, with young children, a working or non-working partner, what are the optics and benefits of different models? What are the lessons learned from those in the field?
      -
    • Strange Bedfellows: Charter Schools and Independent Schools

      2016

      How have independent schools shaped charter schools?  Hear the stories of former independent school educators now leading charter schools. The stories of these leaders, what drew them to charter schools, the practices they adopted from independent schools, and what they have learned in charter schools that could benefit independent schools is the focus of this presentation.
      Presented ByTyler Kusunoki, Beijing Capstone Prep Education Center; Molly Jane Layton, Brooklyn Prospect Charter School; Pearl Rock Kane, The Klingenstein Center
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhy do independent school administrators and faculty migrate to charter schools, and who are the people likely to make that move?   How does an independent school background impact a charter school leader’s vision and practice for his or her school?   What can charter and independent school leaders learn from each other in ways that would enhance their respective schools?
      -
    • SWOT Analysis for Heads: Make Data Work for You

      2020

      Jon Moser of Finalsite and Pat Bassett of Heads Up Educational Consulting will share how you can analyze your school’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats with data-driven information that will help you to make better decisions. We’ll explore how strengths can drive your school’s future engagement with an increasingly mobile and web-savvy constituency. Case studies will highlight what you need to be thinking about now. View the presentation: https://www.dropbox.com/s/l0t418d4hypxvp8/swot%20analysis%20for%20heads%20of%20school%20-%20nais%202016.pptx?dl=0
      Presented ByJon Moser, finalsite and Patrick Bassett, Heads Up Educational Consulting
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can one correctly analyze a school's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats? How can one engage constituents by highlighting a school's strengths? How can one use data to prove return on investment?
      -
    • The Catalytics of Change: Stories of Design, Agency, and Innovation in a School

      2022

      Independent schools are often able to be creative and agile in their efforts to grow as forward-thinking institutions. Yet, schools face complex obstacles as they work to innovate. Design Thinking as a process can help to create a culture that fosters catalytic agents of innovation (administrators, teacher, students and parents alike) as well as make space for the calamities that inevitably follow movement toward the unknown.
      Presented ByTom Thorpe, Meg Hill, Martha Smith, Nick Bain, and Renee Rockford, Colorado Academy (CO)
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How can design thinking be used as a process to allow for success and failure on the journey to grow a culture of innovation in schools? How might schools cultivate greater student agency as institutions while promoting excellence and an engaged perspective?  What practices should schools institute to foster innovation?
      -
    • The Emerging Conversation: Online Reviews of Independent Schools

      2024

      Online reviews are a critical source of brand image on sites from Yelp to Amazon, but have been given less attention by independent schools. GreatSchools.org, message boards, and chat groups are emerging as conversation hubs domestically and for international parents with less access to information. Join a headmaster alongside PR and international admissions experts to discuss case studies and strategies to manage your institution’s image.
      Presented ByKetan Gajria, The Cambridge Institute of International Education (MA); Rebecca Bresee, Hampton Roads Academy (VA); Patti Georgevich, Consultant
      -
      TrackLeadership Development
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow important are online reviews to the reputation and brand image of my school with prospective parent applicants domestically and internationally? How can I locate and respond to online feedback for my school, both positive and negative? How can I develop and manage social media conversations about my school to take greater control of my reputation and brand image?
      -
  • Management
    • Independent School Business Officer Transitions: Succession Planning, Timing, and Search

      2008

      This session will present the finding of research about independent school business officer transitions. The focus will be on three key areas: timing of the change, opportunity for succession planning, and the search process itself. Through a series of case studies, the presenter will provide guidance and best practice to attendees which will lead to a successful hire of a new business officer at their school.
      Presented ByMarc Levinson, Mid-South Independent School Business Officers
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What is the optimal timing for a new business officer to start at an independent school? Can school leadership create effective succession planning for the business officer position?
      -
    • Risk Management, Legal and Practical Challenges for Off-Campus Programming

      2012

      Independent schools understand and value the enrichment that off-campus experiential learning can offer to students.  Standard field trips are common, but increasingly, schools do so much more - both in the U.S. and internationally.  Activities and trips include hiking, camping, rafting, homestays and rock climbing, to name a few. How are schools assessing and managing risks in this programming – risks to both the student and to the school? How does this programming differ from, but intersect with, a school’s traditional trips and activities? What are the associated legal and practical issues? Come join the conversation to gain perspective on a manageable approach to these issues.
      Presented ByCatherine Hansen-Stamp, Attorney; Debra Wilson, NAIS
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhy it is important to assess and consider the intersection between this off campus experiential programming and existing school trips and activities? Why it is important for a school to assess and manage risks to the student as well as to the school? Why it is important to consider the role that teachers play in experiential off campus programming, whether or not the school has hired an independent contractor or third party provider to conduct all or part of a program?  
      -
    • The Compelling Case for Instructional Coaching

      3002

      What is the central mission of every school? Teaching and learning. Yet how much rigorous conversation takes place every day and in a variety of ways about teaching and learning? How can schools become environments where observation, feedback, and ongoing conversations about teaching and learning are commonplace - part of the air breathed? Hire an inspired and inspiring instructional coach.
      Presented ByMatthew Horvat, Brenda Leaks, Gerald Buhaly, and Jessica Hanson, The Overlake School (WA)
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreHow can schools create a culture where observation, feedback, and dialogue about teaching and learning occur regularly? How can schools implement an instructional coaching model? Will hiring an instructional coach signal to the parent community that your faculty is not strong?
      -
    • Triple Threat: Crisis Management, Reputational Risk, and Business Continuity

      3022

      One of the greatest issues facing independent schools today is the issue of crisis management and the threat to reputational risk and business continuity for the school.  This session will use case studies and actual claims to help identify best practices and strategic models for schools to follow.
      Presented ByRonald Wanglin and Cheryl McDowell, Bolton & Company; Constance Neary, United Educators Insurance Risk Retention Group; and Lisa Turchan, The Buckley School (CA)
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can one address crisis management in and independent school  environment? How can one address and manage reputational risk? How can one establish a business continuity plan for the school?
      -
    • Using Branding as a Catalyst for Thriving Auxillary Programs

      2009

      An interactive session on how branding can be a catalyst to creating successful programs.  When is it important for your camp and school to share branding, and when is it important for you to brand in unique ways and what options exist in the middle? Do your summer camp goals match up with your school's mission? Examine current branding trends from Fortune 500 companies and how we can apply them to our programs.
      Presented ByDan ONeil, The Congressional Schools of Virginia (VA) and Karen McCann McClelland, Sidwell Friends School (VA)
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can you take a team approach in developing your auxiliary/summer/co-curricular program goals to match your branding strategy (e.g. involving development, communication, admissions, HR, etc.)? What lessons can we apply to schools from Fortune 500 companies co-branding successes and failures? What effect does your branding strategy for auxiliary programs have on enrollment?
      -
    • What's Google Got to Do with It? Independent School Enrollment in the Internet Era

      3018

      The new generation of parents has countless resources at its fingertips to answer nearly any question. But, when it comes to deciding to enroll a child in an independent school, Google doesn’t have the answer, and parents feel stuck. This session will address how independent schools can strategically communicate with young parents who are data driven, juggling two full-time jobs, and expect a guaranteed return on their investment.
      Presented ByJennifer Elkin, Angela Brown, and Kate Moran, The Pike School (MA)
      -
      TrackManagement
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore The ROI Parent: How do you quantify the intangible benefits of an independent school education? Constant Q&A: How do you satiate the thirst for an overabundance of information from prospective parents? Beyond the Open House: What are alternative methods for reaching prospective families?
      -
  • The Classroom Experience
    • Become a Guided Math Guru: Differentiating Math Instruction

      3024

      Do you love teaching math every day?  Or are you overwhelmed by standards, curricular changes and technology in your math program? Unlock the power of small group guided math instruction!  In this workshop, participants will learn how to introduce, set-up, and develop guided math groups as a way to engage all learners. Our goal is to give ideas that you can use in your classroom tomorrow to make math fun again!
      Presented ByKerry Plitnick and Emily Shortridge, Charleston Day School (SC)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore Math centers are overwhelming, where do I start?  How do I continually assess my students?  Will this model close the gap between struggling and advanced learners?
      -
    • Create CODE (Coding Opportunities Delivered in Education)

      2001

      Coding is a digital literacy that is needed in K-12 education. Learning the fundamentals of coding provides students with skills for the future.  It teaches many 21st century skill such as problem solving and critical thinking. Be part of a worldwide movement and learn the benefits of implementing a coding program as part of your school culture.
      Presented ByDean Haratsaris and Sharon Deighton, Detroit Country Day School (MI)
      -
      TrackThe Classroom Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore What is coding and why is it so important in K-12 education? What are some best practices for incorporating coding into your school culture and curriculum? What resources are available to assist in creating coding opportunities in K-12 education?
      -
  • The Student Experience
    • Ethical Choices: Developing 21st Century Leaders

      2003

      How do we equip students to navigate 21st century issues and become ethical leaders? This workshop presents a values-based approach to ethical decision-making and provides you with the skills needed to facilitate ethical conversations in your classroom. Participants will receive case studies, sample topics, and a decision-making protocol.
      Presented ByEva Lazar and Karen Rezach, Kent Place School (NJ)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore How do we equip our students to navigate this 21st century landscape and become tomorrow’s ethical leaders? What tools can we provide to students to help them identify their own values and become familiar with the ethical decision-making process? How can educators implement the ethical decision-making process in different settings and disciplines?
      -
    • Gender and Sexuality Diversity in PK – 12: Old Story? Same Story? New Story.

      2006

      Gender and sexuality have always been core aspects of identity development for PreK-12 students, yet in 2016, educators are unsure about how/when/whether to engage with these issues at school. Gender and sexual diversity is a contemporary framework for understanding socio-emotional and cognitive aspects of gender identity and sexual identity development of all students. Explore language/skills/curriculum. Bring questions, humility and humor!
      Presented ByJennifer Bryan, Team Finch Consultants
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How can PreK-12 educators organize their thinking about biological sex, gender identity, and sexuality identity development? What is the developmentally appropriate language to use with children and parents when discussing gender and sexuality diversity? How can the gender and sexual diversity framework be used to inform  programs, policies, and curricula?
      -
    • Staying Ahead Of The Curve: Addressing Student Sexual Assault

      2014

      Over the last five years, higher education has received all of the attention regarding student sexual assault.  That focus will likely shift to K-12 institutions. This session will provide an in-depth discussion of student sexual assault, assess potential legal claims against K-12 schools, and discuss best practices and practical steps schools can take to mitigate risk.
      Presented ByScott Schneider and Suzanne Bogdan, Fisher & Phillips, LLP (FL)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What can K-12 schools learn from the way colleges and universities have handled student sexual assault? What proactive steps can K-12 schools take to manage risk associated with student sexual assault? What legal claims are being brought against K-12 schools in the area of student sexual assault?
      -
    • The Journey: Fostering Meaningful Institutional Work on Equity and Inclusion

      3001

      Equity and inclusion are central to many independent school missions. But what does that commitment look like “on the ground”?  How are schools encouraging faculty to stretch in these areas?  In this session, two department chairs and two school administrators will discuss their practical efforts to keep equity and inclusion at the heart of school decision-making from the board room to the classroom.
      Presented ByBlake Spraggins, Holly Hinderlie, Marjo Talbott, Nicholas Michalopoulos, and Laurel Reitman, Maret School (DC)
      -
      TrackThe Student Experience
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can schools foster honest conversation about equity and inclusion?  What practical measures can help schools approach issues of equity and inclusion?  What first steps are practical in my own school setting?
      -
​​​​
 

 Highlighted Sponsor

 
 

 From Twitter...