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One-Hour Workshops: Leadership Development Track

Designed for heads and all academic and administrative leaders, these workshops focus on effective school leadership. ​​​​​​

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    • Stories About the Power of Diversity from Diverse Heads and Their Spouses Part 1

      2005

      This two-part workshop will include three diverse heads of school and their spouses who will tell their stories about their rise to the first family position.  They will discuss the issues they considered before making the decision to become a head of school, the aspects they looked for in their boards, the roles their spouses play at their institutions, and the rewards of being an diverse leader.
      Presented ByGail Suitor, Boulder Country Day School (CO); Shauna Betof, Boston University Academy (MA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What special gifts does a diverse head of school and their family bring to a school community? What should a rising diverse leader consider as they embark on a head of school career? What does a diverse leader look for in a board of trustees?
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    • Stories About the Power of Diversity from Diverse Heads and Their Spouses: Part 2

      2004

      In the first part of this workshop, three diverse heads of school and their spouses tell their stories about their rise to the first family position.  During this second part, our moderator will ask the couples questions about the gifts and challenges they have faced in leadership, how they balance work/family life, what roles their spouses play, advice for rising diverse leaders and their families, and what they looked for in a board.
      Presented ByGail Suitor, Boulder Country Day School (CO); Shauna Betof, Boston University Academy (MA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What special gifts does a diverse head of school and their family bring to a school community? What should a rising diverse leader consider as they embark on a head of school career? What does a diverse leader look for in a board of trustees?
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  • Block 1 (Thursday, February 25, 8:00 - 9:00 AM)
    • Ahead of The Curve: Growing a Culture of Innovation at Your School

      2000

      Do you have people on your faculty doing amazing things? Are you an early adopter who sometimes feels out of place and alone among your colleagues? In this session, administrators will learn how to support the leaders among their faculty and engender a culture of risk taking in their schools. Innovative teachers will be inspired to continue to take risks and try new things, and learn where to go inside and outside their classrooms for support.
      Presented ByLiz Davis, Synapse School (CA), Karen Blumberg, The School at Columbia University (NY), Kim Sivick, PAIS, and Hadley Ferguson, The Edcamp Foundation (PA)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How do administrators create an atmosphere that is welcoming to innovators? How do administrators recognize, locate, and support the individuals who are taking risks and trying new things? How can innovative faculty find the support they need to continue doing great work?
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    • Developing Cultural and Global Competency Curriculum for Academic Leaders

      2004

      Recognizing that school leaders play a critical role in shaping institutional discourse around cultural and global competency, learn about one school’s year-long professional development sequence on this important topic. Participants will leave the session with a clear roadmap for initiating similar leadership-level conversation in their own schools.
      Presented ByAnne Graybeal and Marie Michael, The Blake School (MN)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore Why is it essential for school leadership to be culturally and globally competent? How can a school engage its institutional and academic leadership in ongoing professional development around cultural and global competency? What is one model for in-house professional development in cultural and global competency for school leadership?
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    • From Inspection to Reflection: A Journey from Top-down Evaluation to Instructional Coaching

      2007

      McLean Middle School embarked on an experiment, replacing top-down teacher evaluation with instructional coaching to improve instruction. Teachers used a professional growth rubric, met one-on-one with the instructional coach,  and chose skills to develop. After peer observations, teachers exchanged feedback. We were trailblazers; there was no turning back, and no end to this process of self-reflection and mutual support.
      Presented ByKate Rizzi, Robyn Wise, and David Roth, McLean School of Maryland (MD)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How does giving teachers the choice to set professional goals and providing instructional coaching improve their motivation to implement positive change in their teaching practices? Why is a skill-based, growth-oriented model superior to a one-time performance review and attendance at mass PD presentations? What is the impact on a school's culture when it moves from reliance on ineffective performance reviews toward becoming a learning community in which all members share, reflect upon, and learn from their successes and failures?
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    • Head of School as Storyteller in Chief

      2006

      Fellowship Workshop

      Great stories attract great families.  We decoded how NAIS Heads of School convey their value proposition. Join us as we pull back the curtain on telling outstanding stories. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByArvind Grover, Grace Church School (NY); Eric Marner, Gilman School (MD); Steve McManus, Friends School of Baltimore (MD); Joey Menendez, Westminster School of Augusta (GA); John Rigney, Hyde School (CT)
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      LevelIntroductory
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    • Leadership + Design Lab: Seeking 21st Century Talent

      2010

      ​Want to foster students’ 21st century skills – creativity, teamwork, critical thinking? Start by seeking and developing those traits in teachers and leaders. Partner with Silicon Valley HR pros and use playful design thinking to explode and reimagine school hiring practices, from recruiting to interviewing and ongoing professional development.
      Presented ByMatt Glendinning, Moses Brown School (RI) and Carla Silver, Leadership+Design
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow can we overcome the hidden assumptions that shape (and limit) traditional hiring practices? What can educators learn from Silicon Valley about recruiting 21st-century talent? How can rethinking hiring help your school carry out its mission?
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    • Measuring School Success: Determining the Right Indicators for Your 21st Century School

      2006

      Fellowship Workshop

      Explore the factors that different types of schools and school leaders consider as they try to assess whether or not they are accomplishing their missions. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented BySusan Dempf, Carrollton School of the Sacred Heart (FL); Michael Dibbert, Saint John School (MA); Rebecca Jackman, Commonwealth School (MA); Heather Mock, Alexander Dawson School (CO); Benjamin Rous, Hampton Roads Academy (VA); Deborah Strainge, Tower School (MA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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  • Block 2 (Thursday, February 25, 12:00 - 1:00 PM)
    • Building the ‘Edu-Community’ of the future

      2006

      Fellowship Workshop

      How can independent schools stay relevant to changing demographics, remain financially sustainable, and make it clear that their value is worth their cost? This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByNicholas Cofod, Town School for Boys, (CA); Will Crissman, Milton Academy (MA); Ray Diffley, Choate Rosemary Hall (CT); Ben Goodrich, Montclair Kimberley Academy (NJ); Stephen Lovejoy, St. Francis Episcopal Day School (TX); Gregory Martin, La Jolla Country Day School (CA); David Perry, International School Nido de Aquilas (CHILE)
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      LevelIntroductory
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    • Lessons From the Field - Catalyzing Change

      2014

      Even in the most successful school, change is necessary. Each of the heads in this session has orchestrated careful change in highly regarded schools. Through a look at three real case studies, participants in this session will leave with a toolkit of ideas for introducing and shepherding change in their schools. The theoretical underpinning of change management, the challenges and dangers, will all be discussed.
      Presented ByJudith Schechtman and Marc Frankel, Triangle Associates, Lisa Darling, The Awty International School (NM), Lisa Lyle, Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School (MO), and Byron Hulsey, Woodberry Forest School (VA)
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      LevelAdvanced
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      Explore How can leaders engage a school and board in new thinking when the school is already highly successful?  How can we use an inquiry model to build community commitment to change? When should we go "all in" and when should we titrate change?
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    • So You Think You Want to be a Head of School? An NAIS Fellow’s Exploration

      2006

      Fellowship Workshop

      Teacher. CEO. Fundraiser. Ringmaster. All of the above? Join us as we explore trends in leadership and demystify the role of the Head of School. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByJoseph Codispoti, Harding Academy (TN); Chris Cox, Ravenscroft School, (NC); Kyle Egan, St. Agatha's School Milton (MA); Basil Kolani, Dwight School (NY); Jeff Martin, Covenant Preparatory School (CT); Daniel Seiden, Asheville School, (NC)
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      LevelIntroductory
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    • Spectacular Fails: A Learning Community Takes Risks and Celebrates Failing Forward

      3000

      The Northwest Association of Public Schools piloted a new model of shared learning at the 2015 Spring Heads Meeting and Leadership Institute. Attendees were invited to bring a story for an open mic setting that represented a profound moment of learning through spectacular failure. Come join us, hear stories, and maybe even tell one. See how this model could support learning in pubic, failing forward, and building community at your next retreat or faculty meeting.
      Presented ByEmily McGrath and Siri Akal Khalsa, Northwest Association of Independent Schools, Percy Abram, The Bush School (WA), and Kisha Palmer, Forest Ridge School of the Sacred Heart (WA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How can I support development of a professional learning community that supports administrators and faculty in risk taking and failing forward? How do I go about setting up a spectacular fails open mic? What does a spectacular fail session look and feel like?
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    • The Edward E. Ford Foundation: Who We Are, What We Do, What We’re Seeing, and What to Expect from Us

      3001

      This workshop will present everything you ever wanted to know about the Edward E. Ford Foundation. The nuts and bolts of applying for Foundation grants will be explained. There will be a summary of some of the more unusual and interesting recent proposals that the Foundation has funded. Some of the possible future plans for the Foundation's work will be discussed and there will be the opportunity for those interested to suggest future areas of focus for the Leadership Grants.
      Presented ByJohn Gulla, The Edward E. Ford Foundation
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore Who can apply and what does the process involve, what is the timeline and how does one get started? What recent proposals have been funded and what patterns are evident to the Foundation as it engages with independent schools of all stripes all over the country? What suggestions might schools have for the Foundation? How can the Foundation best support the work of independent schools?
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    • Why Schools Should Train New Teachers: Lessons from the Progressive Education Lab

      3018

      Where do you find your teachers?  Have you considered growing your own teachers? Come learn about the Progressive Education Laboratory, an Edward E. Ford Foundation-funded collaboration among four schools that prepares recent college graduates to work in progressive schools and “to become agents of change in the profession.”  We will share our lessons learned and discuss the ways schools can take back the all-important business of training teachers.
      Presented ByJennifer de Forest, Progressive Education Laboratory; Jane Moulding, Cambridge School of Weston (MA); Sharon Lauer, The Unquowa School (CT); and Emily Jones, The Putney School (VT)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow might schools take back the all-important business of training teachers? What are the rewards and challenges of working collaboratively with other schools to tackle big problems in our field? What kind of experience is most important to you when you recruit and hire new teachers?
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    • Women in Independent School Leadership: How Does It Work?

      3020

      Three school heads, all women, will explore the particular advantages, benefits, and challenges of leading as a female in an independent school and how we might best encourage women to consider school leadership. Anecdotal experiences, relevant data, and recommended reading will be shared with the help of a moderator, a former head of school herself.
      Presented ByClaudia Daggett, Independent Schools Association of the Central States, Laura Fuller, University School of Milwaukee (WI), Ann Klotz, Laurel School (OH), and Melissa Soderberg, The Columbus Academy (OH)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreWhat are the particular advantages, benefits, and challenges of being a female school leader? Why aren't more women interested in headship? How might we best encourage women to consider headship?
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  • Block 3 (Thursday, February 25, 2:45 - 3:45 PM)
    • Beating Tuition Dependence With Alternative Revenue Sources

      2008

      Fellowship Workshop

      Financial sustainability depends on breaking dependence on tuition dollars.  Find out how schools are getting creative with alternate income streams to increase affordability. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByQuincey Grieve, St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School (VA); Trisha Medeiros, Stuart Country Day School (NJ); William Morris, Choate Rosemary Hall (CT); Kristen Ring, Bayside Academy (AL); Jennifer White, The Emery/Weiner School (TX)
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      LevelIntroductory
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    • Brand Clarity is Key to Your Leadership and to Your School’s Success

      2004

      Brand clarity ultimately involves creativity but first requires objective analysis, rigorous market research, and frank reflection on your value proposition. This session describes a strategic approach to developing a competitive brand identity. It offers insight into the bold leadership it takes to get there while navigating the charged issues of culture and tradition.
      Presented ByBen Edwards, Art & Science Group (NC) and Scott Erickson, The Phillips Brooks School (CA)
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      LevelAdvanced
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      Explore How can you be a trailblazer leading your school towards brand clarity? In leading your school’s brand clarity process, what risks should you consider taking and what pitfalls and potential mistakes will you encounter along the way? What are the most notable rewards and improvements that result from a school’s brand clarity?
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    • Cultural Competency for Graduates of the Future: are we doing enough?

      2008

      Fellowship Workshop

      Cultural competence (CC) is considered a core principle of necessary value in independent schools. We present an analysis of the impact of CC from the leadership perspective. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByElizabeth Ashforth, Marlborough School (CA); Brenda Crawley, Sandy Spring Friends School (MD); Donna Lindner, The Agnes Irwin School (PA); Kimberly Ridley, Gordon School (RI); Mónica Ruiz-Meléndez, Westtown School (PA); Todd Zehner, St. Johns Country Day School (FL); Martha Cunningham, Maret School (DC)
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      LevelIntroductory
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    • Exploring the Edges: Stories of Collaborations that Rethink Time, Space and Place

      2007

      What does it mean to collaborate by rethinking time, space, and place? Does everyone have to be in the same place? How is collaboration defined in a truly blended learning environment? This session will explore innovation and collaboration through the lens of time, place, and space. We’ll reflect on three unique models of collaboration and what it means to collaborate by rethinking time, space, and place.
      Presented ByAmy Hollinger, Emily Hamlin, and Susan Fine, Global Online Academy (WA); Beth Calderone, The Blake School (MN)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow can rethinking collaboration in terms of time, space, and place promote innovation in your school? What small steps can leaders take toward nurturing new models of collaboration? What resources are available to support this evolution?
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    • G​rowing in Self-Knowledge: Storytelling and Personal Testimony with Your School and Self

      2010

      Our life stories shape our leadership. Join us for an interactive SEED-inspired session where we will delve into our own stories and the ways in which they affect our faculty, students, school culture and our own daily work in schools. Listen to the journeys of others, share your own and learn how storytelling and serial testimony can be catalysts for satisfying and systemic work.
      Presented ByAshley Marshall, The Lovett School (GA) and Peggy McIntosh, The Wellesley Centers for Women and the National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How does some aspect of my own life outside of school particularly inform the kind of leadership I show in class or in school? How do I feel that my stories could affect faculty, students, and the wider school culture in a positive way? Is there anything systemic in my background that impedes my attention to myself as a confident educator ,​trailblazer, catalyst, or person facing calamities?
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    • Green Ribbon Schools: The Story of Environmentally Sustainable Schools

      2012

      In 2015 the U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools program recognized six NAIS schools.  Leaders from these exemplary schools will present their innovative achievements.  We will describe the process to apply for Green Ribbon Schools recognition and explain how this program develops more sustainable facilities, operations, and curriculum.
      Presented ByPaul Chapman, Prospect Sierra School (CA); Lucinda Lee Katz, Marin Country Day School (CA); Tamar Cunha, Greens Farms Academy (CT); Paul Stellato, Princeton Day School (NJ); John Farber, Old Trail School (OH); and Dan Frank, The Steward School (VA)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore What is the Green Ribbon Schools program?  What are the characteristics of green, environmentally sustainable schools?  And how do the NAIS Green Ribbon Schools exemplify best practices for our member schools to follow?
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    • It’s A Girl(s Charter School)!: The Story of Birthing a Public-Private Partnership

      2020

      Roland Park Country School, in collaboration with The Bryn Mawr School, created the Lillie May Carroll Jackson Charter School as a catalyst for educational change in Baltimore. Discover the story of LMCJCS, hear from school leaders and the inaugural class of scholars, and discuss the big risks and big rewards on this ground-breaking brand of public-private partnership.
      Presented ByShannon Montague and Peter Metsopolous, The Bryn Mawr School (MD); Carla Spawn-van Berkum, Roland Park Country School (MD); and Laurel Freedman, Lillie May Carroll Jackson Charter School (MD)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How and why is it important for  independent school communities to cultivate and sustain interest in building partnerships with their local school districts? How do public-private partnerships inspire connections and build community? What’s the path out of our independent school silos individually or as an institution?
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    • The Professional Development Process as a Means to Institutionalizing Diversity Goals

      3001

      This workshop focuses on how professional development for faculty, staff, and administrators can institutionalize diversity goals at independent schools. Learn how intentional planning of professional development results in cultural shifts where responsibility for diversity initiatives shifts from that of the individual to that of the institution by providing opportunities for leadership to all members of the school community.
      Presented ByDavid Duane, Tete Cobblah, and Gerard Ward, The Fenn School (MA)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreWhat role does professional development play in fostering growth and leadership as a means to creating institutional change? What are the catalysts and leverage points that schools can use to persist and overcome pitfalls and calamities as they satisfy institutional goals? How does a school intentionally plan and create cultural shifts so that the responsibility of diversity initiatives shift from that of the individual to that of the institution?
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    • Two Brains Are Better Than One! The New Normal - Creating Effective Head/Assistant Head Collaboration

      3002

      The expectations of heads are daunting. New heads are full of hope but challenged by the realities of the position. Rising stars, the future leaders, need mentorship. Authentic, powerful head/assistant head of school teams are the right solution. Through case studies, we will explore creating relationships to navigate successful collaboration and offer a model of healthy, fulfilling, effective teams.
      Presented ByMatthew Stuart, The Caedmon School (NY) and Honor Taft, Gill St Bernard's School (NJ)
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      LevelAdvanced
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      Explore How do you thoughtfully and respectfully define and balance the exact roles of head and assistant head of school? Is it always “the head’s decision?” How do you continue to build a successful partnership, staying attuned throughout the ongoing process? How do you define and communicate your roles to the entire school community?
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  • Block 4 (Friday, February 26, 8:00 - 9:00 AM)
    • “A Badger, a Porcupine, a Dormouse and a Sloth All Walk Into a Job Interview…”

      3020

      Although we have the capacity, we seldom measure the factors that actually cause most new hire failures. This workshop will present a model that uses the latest assessment tools to look inside candidates’ heads BEFORE you hire them. This sequence of steps can boost hiring accuracy from 14% to nearly 90%. The session will include a pragmatic mindset, relevant examples, good humor, and minimal but very helpful handouts.
      Presented BySteve Chapman, Broad Reach Strategies
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      LevelAdvanced
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      Explore How do a person’s behavior style, motivators, soft-skill competencies, and clarity of worldview let us predict their potential for success and how can these be measured BEFORE you offer a contract?  Why is it so common that an educator with huge success at a very similar school can arrive here and do so poorly?  How can this process be used to nurture a "socially intelligent" school culture and foster meaningful collaboration?
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    • Business Concepts: No longer the 'Dirty Words' in Education

      2005

      Fellowship Workshop

      Schools can no longer afford to view "branding", "clients", and "bottom-line" as dirty words.  Demographics, rising tuition, and increased competition make it imperative for school leaders to understand and use these concepts to maximize institutional capacity. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByLise Charlier, Severn School (MD); Michelle Dowling, Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart (NJ); La Vina Lowery, Menlo School (CA); Jennifer Rao, Garrison Forest School (MD); Craig Williamson, Chadwick International (SOUTH KOREA); Frances Hoover, The Philadelphia School (PA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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    • From Content to Context: PD for the Future Independent School

      2005

      Fellowship Workshop

      A vibrant independent school in the future must prepare faculty in six key areas to help today’s “complicated” learners succeed. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByJeannine Clarke, St. Margaret's Episcopal School (CA); Claire Hornung-Smith, St. Andrews (FL); Susanne Johnson, Barnesville School of Arts & Sciences (MD); Craig Tredenick, All Saints' Episcopal School (TX); Derrick Willard, Providence Day School (NC); Polly Williams, The Galloway School (GA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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    • Herstory: Behind, in Front of, Next to Every Female Leader, There is a...

      2007

      As we understand the need for capacity and pipelines for female leadership roles in schools, we feel it is important to adequately describe our roles as women in leadership and encourage, celebrate, and cultivate the future and current leaders within our communities. Strategic timing and calculated risk taking are critical to having more female leaders take the leap into such roles.
      Presented ByPenny Bach Evins, St. Paul's School for Girls (MD); Stephanie Balmer, Harpeth Hall School (TN); Ann Klotz, Laurel School (OH); Tekakwitha Pernambuco-Wise, Sea Crest School (CA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What does it take to feel and be successful as a female leader? Whether single, married, with young children, a working or non-working partner, what are the optics and benefits of different models? What are the lessons learned from those in the field?
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    • Strange Bedfellows: Charter Schools and Independent Schools

      2016

      How have independent schools shaped charter schools?  Hear the stories of former independent school educators now leading charter schools. The stories of these leaders, what drew them to charter schools, the practices they adopted from independent schools, and what they have learned in charter schools that could benefit independent schools is the focus of this presentation.
      Presented ByTyler Kusunoki, Beijing Capstone Prep Education Center; Molly Jane Layton, Brooklyn Prospect Charter School; Pearl Rock Kane, The Klingenstein Center
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreWhy do independent school administrators and faculty migrate to charter schools, and who are the people likely to make that move?   How does an independent school background impact a charter school leader’s vision and practice for his or her school?   What can charter and independent school leaders learn from each other in ways that would enhance their respective schools?
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    • SWOT Analysis for Heads: Make Data Work for You

      2020

      Jon Moser of Finalsite and Pat Bassett of Heads Up Educational Consulting will share how you can analyze your school’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats with data-driven information that will help you to make better decisions. We’ll explore how strengths can drive your school’s future engagement with an increasingly mobile and web-savvy constituency. Case studies will highlight what you need to be thinking about now. View the presentation: https://www.dropbox.com/s/l0t418d4hypxvp8/swot%20analysis%20for%20heads%20of%20school%20-%20nais%202016.pptx?dl=0
      Presented ByJon Moser, finalsite and Patrick Bassett, Heads Up Educational Consulting
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow can one correctly analyze a school's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats? How can one engage constituents by highlighting a school's strengths? How can one use data to prove return on investment?
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    • The Catalytics of Change: Stories of Design, Agency, and Innovation in a School

      2022

      Independent schools are often able to be creative and agile in their efforts to grow as forward-thinking institutions. Yet, schools face complex obstacles as they work to innovate. Design Thinking as a process can help to create a culture that fosters catalytic agents of innovation (administrators, teacher, students and parents alike) as well as make space for the calamities that inevitably follow movement toward the unknown.
      Presented ByTom Thorpe, Meg Hill, Martha Smith, Nick Bain, and Renee Rockford, Colorado Academy (CO)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can design thinking be used as a process to allow for success and failure on the journey to grow a culture of innovation in schools? How might schools cultivate greater student agency as institutions while promoting excellence and an engaged perspective?  What practices should schools institute to foster innovation?
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    • The Emerging Conversation: Online Reviews of Independent Schools

      2024

      Online reviews are a critical source of brand image on sites from Yelp to Amazon, but have been given less attention by independent schools. GreatSchools.org, message boards, and chat groups are emerging as conversation hubs domestically and for international parents with less access to information. Join a headmaster alongside PR and international admissions experts to discuss case studies and strategies to manage your institution’s image.
      Presented ByKetan Gajria, The Cambridge Institute of International Education (MA); Rebecca Bresee, Hampton Roads Academy (VA); Patti Georgevich, Consultant
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow important are online reviews to the reputation and brand image of my school with prospective parent applicants domestically and internationally? How can I locate and respond to online feedback for my school, both positive and negative? How can I develop and manage social media conversations about my school to take greater control of my reputation and brand image?
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  • Block 5 (Friday, February 26, 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM)
    • Executive Mentoring: The Critical Component of Leadership Development

      2005

      Learn to lead on the job! Despite the fact that the corporate world has adopted executive mentoring, independent schools have been slow to embrace this important component of leadership development. Hear two heads of school and a middle school director talk about the importance of a formal mentoring relationship that helps them to gain deeper insight into leadership challenges and the change process.
      Presented ByThomas Olverson, Resource Group 175; Mary Carter, The Derryfield School (NH); Paul Baker, Episcopal School of Acadiana, Inc. (LA); and David Roth, McLean School of Maryland (MD)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore What is executive mentoring? Why is it a critical part of the professional development of heads and senior administrators? What impact can it have on a school?
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    • Institutional Research: Getting Our Data to Talk and Our Community to Listen

      2024

      Lick-Wilmerding High School continues to evolve in its use of institutional research to reveal our school’s identity and its ability to fulfill its mission, informing decisions at all levels. Learn how we form strategic data research groups, train faculty, staff, and admin to use data, and leverage our community’s diverse perspectives to analyze data, ultimately allowing us to ask and answer more compelling, mission-driven questions.
      Presented ByMariel Triggs, Eric Temple, Colleen Nyeggen, and Randy Barnett, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow can we make massive amounts of quantitative data accessible, useful and digestible for our community members? Who should be a part of the collecting and analyzing of the data and what protocols for collaborative analysis actually deepen our understanding and create buy-in by the community? How can schools incorporate classroom video in professional development in a rigorous, meaningful, and non-threatening way?
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    • New Orleans Scholars – An Edward E. Ford Foundation Educational Leadership Grant in Action

      3002

      Is your school interested in developing civic leadership as part of a public purpose agenda? Is your school being considered for an Edward E. Ford Educational Leadership Grant or envisioning ways to enhance experiential learning for the betterment of your community? Join us for a panel presentation on the New Orleans Scholars Program, a collaborative program between Metairie Park Country Day School and charter school Ben Franklin High School.
      Presented ByCarolyn Chandler, Howard Hunter, Elizabeth Kehoe, and Vanessa Gentinetta, Metairie Park Country Day School (LA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow can a school use grant funding to broaden the scope of its public purpose through greatercommunity involvement? What creative models can be used to develop civic leadership in the current generation of students? What should a school expect when going through the Edward E. Ford Foundation EducationalLeadership Grant process?
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    • Teacher Quality in Independent Schools

      2009

      Review findings and explore the implications of the recent Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) study, which determined that independent schools use four key characteristics to describe high quality teachers. Independent schools value teachers who develop strong relationships with students, demonstrate strong pedagogical knowledge and content expertise, possess a growth mindset about their own capacity, and fit well within the school’s culture.  
      Presented ByNatalia Hernandez, Isidore-Newman School (LA); Matt Balossi, School District of Clayton
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow do independent school practitioners describe high quality teachers? Do independent schools’ practices of recruitment and selection reflect what they value in high quality teachers? Do independent schools’ practices of retention and recognition of high quality teachers reflect what they value in high quality teachers?
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    • The Lag in Female Headship - When “Lean In” is Not the Answer

      3000

      Despite statistics documenting that the overwhelming majority of educators in independent schools are women, the historic lag in headship positions persists. Women comprise approximately two-thirds of teachers and administrators but only 34% of NAIS member schools are led by women. In this study we shed light on the problem of female leadership by sharing the perspectives of board chairs, search firms and female division directors.
      Presented ByLindsay Koss, Sinai Akiba Academy (CA); Pearl Kane and Patricia Burns, The Klingenstein Center; Frances Fondren, Holland Hall School (OK); and Lucy Goldstein, Episcopal High School (VA)
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      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreWhy does the gender gap persist in headships in independent schools? Is the lag in female headship due to the unwillingness of women to shoulder major responsibilities for a school, the unwillingness of boards to choose women, or is it the unwillingness of search firms to advocate for female candidates? Given the findings of this study, how can we address the root of the problem?
      -
    • What’s the Next Chapter of Your School’s Story?

      2007

      Fellowship Workshop

      Analyzing trends, market strategy, and case studies of schools adapting their own story, we will outline a roadmap for schools to utilize story as a way to thrive into the future. This 30-minute presentation is part of our NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring School Heads workshop series, presented by the current cohort. All attendees are welcome to join.
      Presented ByTorsie Judkins, The Town School (NY); John Mathews, Potomac School (VA); Mark McLaughlin, Providence Country Day School (RI); Patrick McHonett, Phoenix Country Day School (AZ)
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
    • Why Are All the Black Administrators Sitting Together in the Admin Team Meeting?

      3003

      Are your administrators of color experiencing “racial fatigue”? Does “stereotype threat” hinder your admin of color from speaking their truth or hinder you from hearing it? In this interactive workshop, we will explore the concepts of racial fatigue, stereotype threat, and leadership EQ in order to develop new tools and a framework for heads to more intentionally and mindfully govern their institutions.
      Presented ByAngela Brown and Michael Eatman, The Pike School (MA)
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What are the effects of racial fatigue and stereotype threat on administrators of color? How can heads of school effectively support their administrators of color? How can heads face and dismantle institutional patriarchy in their schools?
      -
  • Block 6 (Friday, February 26, 1:30 - 2:30 PM)
    • Administrator Roundtable: A Model for Participant-Driven Professional Development

      3003

      Let’s talk about what interests YOU! Using the unconference format, come ready to drive discussion topics, share knowledge and passions, and find solutions to common challenges administrators face. Uncover a new method for facilitating professional development to bring back to your own school.
      Presented ByLiz Davis, Synapse School (CA); Lorri Carroll, Hamden Hall Country Day School (CT); Justine Fellows, Greens Farms Academy (CT)
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore What are common challenges that other administrators face? How do other administrators deal with these challenges? How can I better facilitate professional development at my school?
      -
    • International Certification for Your School Community

      2004

      CIS International Certification helps schools educate students to keep pace with internationally recognized standards and enable their development as global citizens. Learn how one school moved forward with whole-school development projects focused on developing intercultural understanding and a range of skills for students.
      Presented ByGraham Ranger and Ann Straub, Council of International Schools (CIS) and Deborah Richman, Turning Point School (CA)
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      ExploreIn what ways can my school strategically focus on the development of students as global citizens? What does intercultural competence look like in a school? How does the International Certification process explore and evaluate a school community’s fundamental values and beliefs about international education and resulting outcomes for their students?
      -
    • Leadership + Design Lab: Seeking 21st Century Talent

      2005

      Want to foster students’ 21st century skills – creativity, teamwork, critical thinking? Start by seeking and developing those traits in teachers and leaders. Partner with Silicon Valley HR pros and use playful design thinking to explode and reimagine school hiring practices, from recruiting to interviewing and ongoing professional development.
      Presented ByMatt Glendinning, Moses Brown School (RI) and Carla Silver, Leadership+Design
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore How can we overcome the hidden assumptions that shape (and limit) traditional hiring practices? What can educators learn from Silicon Valley about recruiting 21st-century talent? How can rethinking hiring help your school carry out its mission?
      -
    • Leading School Change

      3022

      Designed for school leaders, this session will explore the key processes and theories of strategic change. Experienced administrators know that even under the most favorable conditions, leading change can be challenging. This interactive workshop will explore change theory and research-proven leadership strategies associated with building capacity to support change.
      Presented ByAnne-Marie Lohse and Scott Bauer, George Mason University
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat are the most effective strategies and theories associated with school change? As a leader, how can I build the capacity for change – and leadership capacity – in my school? What four questions can leaders use to ensure that their change plans are well developed and that they are ready to move forward with change?
      -
    • Leap of Faith: Challenging Conventions and Rules to Create a Model Program

      2006

      Hear the inspiration, pitfalls, and euphoria of starting a new school from its founder as they share how they create an innovative, evidenced-based, college preparatory program for students on the autism spectrum. Discuss the value and difficulty of collaborative work and get an outline of this unique program as it has evolved over 14 years.
      Presented ByFrederick Weissbach, Mary Murphy, Tom Hays, Rebecca Hays, Cynthia Pope, and Lee Barsom, Franklin Academy (CT)
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What does it take to design and implement an innovative school or program? This involves a balance of skills and temperaments and a vibrant community of educators in addition to financing, buildings, and supplies. What are the primary educational needs of bright students on the autism spectrum and how do we best meet those needs and prepare them for college? What are strategies for creating a dynamic, holistic, and healthy learning community for students, teachers, and administrators?
      -
    • Listening and Reflection: Two North Stars Guiding Authentic Independent School Leadership

      2007

      In an age of rapid communication and immediate gratification, authentic leaders who can put their own stories aside, sit with others, and truly listen are uniquely positioned to connect with others. Examine personal leadership stories and the latest educational research on the power of emotional intelligence, listening, and reflection.
      Presented ByJessica Flaxman, Charlotte Country Day School (NC); Ann Klotz, Laurel School (OH); Melinda Bihn, French American International School (CA); and Lynn Casto, Sanford School (DE)
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      Explore What does effective listening look like in independent school leadership? When and how can reflection be built into the school leader’s day? What are some compelling stories and research that illustrate how listening and reflection empower the school leader to better connect with and understand diverse school constituencies?
      -
    • Ten Heads, Ten Years, Ten Lessons: Members of the INH Class of ’06 Tell Their Tales

      2018

      Over 60 heads of school gathered in July 2006 to take part in NAIS’ Institute for New Heads. Ten years later, ten heads (including INH leader Reveta Bowers) reunite to share ten lessons learned. We welcome sitting heads and heads-to-be to join us for an engaging presentation, rich with wisdom, longitudinal data, reflection, cautionary tale, humor, and inspiration.
      Presented ByJohn Huber, Emerson School (MI); Reveta Bowers, The Center for Early Education (CA); Carolyn Chandler, Metairie Park Country Day School (LA); Ian Craig, Harding Academy (TN); Mark Devey, Perkiomen School (PA); Julie Elam, Marin Primary & Middle School (CA); Josie Holford, Poughkeepsie Day School (NY); Andy Jones-Wilkins, Tandem Friends School (VA); Annette Raphel, Belmont Day School (MA); and Amy Vorenberg, Beauvoir, The National Cathedral Elementary School (DC)
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat lessons can I learn about school leadership from practitioners in the field? How can I avoid the same pitfalls and challenges that these heads have experienced? What is the value of NAIS’ Institute for New Heads?
      -
    • Using Mindfulness and Shared Reflective Practices to Enhance Faculty Culture

      3002

      While content knowledge and pedagogical expertise are crucial, educators also need support for their own emotional and spiritual development.  This interactive session provides a range of practices, including mindfulness, text study, reflective listening, and group sharing, that support teachers and build faculty culture by enhancing reflection, resilience, appreciation, and a shared sense of purpose.
      Presented ByNancy Leaderman, Shalom School (CA)
      -
      LevelIntroductory
      -
      Explore What kinds of support do teachers need to be emotionally and spiritually sustained in their work? What exercises and strategies can we do as a faculty that will build resilience, appreciation, and a shared sense of purpose?  How can educators’ own sense of vulnerability and search for meaning make them more effective educators and role models for their students?
      -
  • Three-Hour Workshops (Wednesday, Feburary 24, 1:00 - 4:00 PM)
    • W09. Establishing Common Ground Between Heads of School and Technology Leaders

      2009

      Optional Three-Hour Workshop

      Technology’s role looms large; it now drives innovation, underpins equity issues and distinguishes schools to prospective families.  In this workshop led by the Association of Technology Leaders in Independent Schools, heads of school and technology leaders will establish common ground through dialogue on tech must-knows and delve into the requirements of today’s innovation initiatives, such as blended learning, making, and BYOD.
      Presented ByKelsey Vrooman, The Urban School of San Francisco (CA); Stuart Posin, Marlborough School (CA); Gabriel Lucas, Association of Technology Leaders in Independent Schools; Sarah Hanawald, Saint Mary's School (NC)
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreFor technology leaders: what information and/or knowledge do you wish your head of school had so that s/he could be a better partner in technology and innovation initiatives? For heads of school: what do you need to know about technology to make more informed decisions in crafting the school’s vision, protecting students, and leading the organization? What elements of leadership and technology are required to successfully support today’s major innovation initiatives?
      -
    • W13. How to Make Your School's Innovation Story a Bestseller

      3002

      Optional Three-Hour Workshop

      Is innovation at your school true romance, poor foreign translation, or murderous crime fiction? Discover how to pair the stages of innovation with the stories leaders must tell to capture the hearts, minds, and collaboration of stakeholders. Edit your school’s narrative to make innovation a well-written story people hope will never end.
      Presented ByJamie Baker and J. Timothy Richards, Pomfret School (CT); Jonathan Martin, JonathanEMartin Ed Services
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreWhat stories does a leader needs to tell him/herself in order to develop the courage and resilience to overcome the challenges of leading innovation and change? How can a leader tap into the emotional and rational reasoning of colleagues and stakeholders when leading change and innovation? What are the specific types of stories leaders need to tell as counter-narratives to the stories the culture is telling and selling?
      -
    • W14. Leadership + Design Lab: Seeking 21st Century Talent

      3003

      Optional Three-Hour Workshop

      Want to foster students’ 21st century skills – creativity, teamwork, and critical thinking? Start by seeking and developing those traits in teachers and leaders. Partner with Silicon Valley HR pros and use playful design thinking to explode and reimagine school hiring practices, from recruiting to interviewing and ongoing professional development. Still want more? Attend optional follow-up sessions on Thursday and Friday.
      Presented ByMatt Glendinning, Moses Brown School (RI); Carla Silver, Leadership+Design
      -
      LevelIntermediate
      -
      ExploreHow can we overcome the hidden assumptions that shape (and limit) traditional hiring practices? What can educators learn from Silicon Valley about recruiting 21st-century talent? How can rethinking hiring help your school carry out its mission?
      -
 

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