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One-Hour Workshops: The Student Experience Track

​Designed for all educators and academic leaders, these workshops focus on the student experience, including equity and justice issues, bullying, student wellness, families, and character development. 

  • Block 1 (Thursday, February 25, 8:00 - 9:00 AM)
    • Beyond Sustainability Toward an Integrated and Regenerative Ecological Approach to School

      2001

      This workshop will examine practical ways schools can create campuses that reach beyond sustainability toward resiliency and regeneration in the face of changing ecological, social, and economic conditions.  The workshop focuses on three main topics: facilities, mission, curriculum design, and their integration will be at the heart of the presentation. Specific examples from The Hotchkiss School's environmental program will be used.
      Presented ByJoshua Hahn, The Hotchkiss School (CT)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can a school align mission, facilities, and curriculum? How can independent schools lead for public purpose? How do we alleviate disconnects between what we teach and what we do at school? How can a school's staff be as integral to learning as a school's faculty? How do we live well together in a place?
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    • Mindful Insights into Student SEL Development

      2012

      Current educational and scientific research suggest noncognitive/SEL traits, such as grit, conscientiousness, and curiosity, factor into a student’s academic and life success. While we explicitly teach cognitive skills, noncognitive, social-emotional, or soft skills have been addressed less formally. Gain best practices to measure and incorporate SEL into the overall school curriculum and culture.
      Presented BySarah Savage and Dave Clune, Educational Records Bureau; Anabel Jensen, Synapse School (CA); and Denise Pope, Stanford School of Education
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreWhat are the most important non-cognitive/SEL traits for student academic, career, and life success? How do we measure and support the development of these traits within the school curriculum and culture as a whole? How does growth in these important traits impact student success throughout their academic careers as well as their lives outside of school?
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    • Turning a Blind Eye to Bullying?

      3002

      Participants will learn about behaviors that constitute bullying (including cyber-bullying), hazing, and harassment; the differences between them; the impact of the behavior; the legal liability; and methods for both combating the behavior and instituting policies and programs that may help the school avoid liability.
      Presented ByCandice Pinares-Baez, Fisher & Phillips, LLP, and Diane Jones, Saint Andrew's School (FL)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreWhat policies and procedures should be in place to combat bullying? What are proper and improper communications in varying bullying scenarios? What are the differences between bullying, hazing, and harassment?
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    • What's the Race to be Done with Race?

      3020

      At a time when college classes are more diverse than ever and one out of every four college students say that racism is no longer a problem in America, why do so many people of color feel so disenfranchised and why do we see such startling evidence on both social and journalistic media that race matters as much as ever? The national conversation about race still sputters with uncertainty and a lack of conviction. Learn what independent schools can do to stem the tide of avoidance and prepare our institutions and students to lead the charge toward an inclusive America.
      Presented ByRobert Greene, Jones and Associates Consulting, Inc.
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore What makes race such a difficult topic to engage in our independent schools? Given the social changes in the last 50 years, is race still as relevant a factor in social relationships as it was during the Civil Rights Movement or have class, region, sexual orientation, and other identifiers superseded race in importance and impact? Most importantly, as the news cycle in the last year has featured numerous stories that involve racial differences and the nation has struggled to open and engage an honest and consistent dialogue about the levels of racism that are still prevalent in American society, what can independent schools do to help shape the narrative and prepare our students to be leaders in the world?
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  • Block 2 (Thursday, February 25, 12:00 - 1:00 PM)
    • "Spiritual but not Religious": Spiritual Care for Students Every Day and in Times of Crisis

      2022

      "I'm not religious but I am spiritual" seems to be the new gospel for younger generations. Teenagers are not attending church or synagogue like they used to and this has big implications for independent schools. Despite lack of church attendance, students still have spiritual and emotional needs and if they are not being met by traditional communities then where? By whom? Come hear ideas for how your school fits in this new religious landscape.
      Presented ByAaron Twitchell, The Pennington School (NJ)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What are the religious and spiritual lives of students like? Based on teenagers' religious and spiritual beliefs, what are their needs, both on a day-to-day basis and, especially, during times of crisis? How can our school meet these needs, whether we are religiously affiliated or not?
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    • Extensive Global Travel: What Motivates One Independent School to Take Such Risks?

      2005

      The French American International School has been running a comprehensive global travel and exchange program for many decades, involving hundreds of students (some as young as ten) and dozens of employees annually. What can we be thinking? What are the benefits to students? Does "being there" in Tahiti, India, Galapagos, Jordan, Tanzania, Senegal, China, Austria, Brazil, Guatemala, France, and Malawi justify the risks?
      Presented ByAndrew Brown, Scott Paton, Minakshi Capur, and Laurent Scotto, French American International School (CA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What are the concrete benefits to students participating in a cultural, linguistic, or exchange program overseas? What are some of the qualitative differences between traveling with a school group and traveling with family? How important is “being there”? Can authentic international-mindedness be fostered perfectly well closer to home?
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    • Girl Powered Tech: A Community Partnership

      2007

      Nonprofits identify partnerships in terms of a grantmaker and receiver. In this presentation discover how four organizations - 2 schools, 1 museum, and a community volunteer organization - came together to create a unique learning experience for girls in tech. This program will add workshops and social emotional learning to improve girls' ability to work in a diverse community while gaining engineering skills and discipline.
      Presented ByAdnan Iftekhar and Stephanie Seto, Synapse School (CA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How does an organization locate like-minded community partners? What are the key things leaders must achieve to launch a successful partnership? What is the best way to design your pilot program to balance learning with scalability for roll out?
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    • Helping Introverts Tell Their Stories and Navigate the Extroverted World of School

      2009

      View the presentation: https://prezi.com/m/0mwvkr0fysam/helping-introverts-navigate-the-extroverted-world-of-school/ Asking an introvert to “try to participate more” is unfair if our classroom methods make doing so impossible. This workshop shows how school life routinely rewards extroversion, and then presents direct classroom strategies that help introverts thrive. Some of our best students are introverts who have spent much of their free time reading, reflecting, and observing their world. We owe them more than a spectator’s seat in their schools.
      Presented ByMeghan Regan-Loomis, The Rivers School (MA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreWhat is the introverted student's experience of school and how can we improve it? What do teachers and extroverted students have to learn from introverts, and how will instituting methods that help them actually help all students? What methods and activities might better draw out the stories, talents, and thinking of students who are more comfortable listening than sharing?
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    • Revitalize Your Upper School Learning Resource Program

      3002

      Latin School of Chicago has developed a learning resource program that supports and empowers students with varied academic needs. This workshop extrapolates best practices from our current program and provides participants with the strategies to design and implement a student self-advocacy driven learning resource program in their schools.
      Presented ByStephen Wright and Jennifer Hayman, The Latin School of Chicago (IL)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow do you elevate your learning resource program's profile within your school? How do you leverage your region's professional community to strengthen your learning resource program?  How do you foster a learning resource program that both supports students and actively encourages them to become self-advocates?
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  • Block 3 (Thursday, February 25, 2:45 - 3:45 PM)
    • A Tale of Two Schools: Catalysts and Calamities of Creating a School Policy to Ban the N-Word

      3024

      This interactive session will highlight the challenges, approaches and other factors that two schools [William Penn Charter School (PA) and Friends Academy (NY)] considered in their creation and implementation of a viable and effective school policy to ban the N-word and other derogatory language. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions, share, and outline their own action plans against the N-word in their schools.
      Presented ByShanelle Robinson, Friends Academy (NY) and Antonio Williams, William Penn Charter School (PA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How can schools create a school policy to address use of the N-word and other derogatory language? How can schools address offensive and/or derogatory language use in educational curriculum and/or by students on social media? What are the advantages and challenges of creating and implementing such a policy?
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    • Blazing Trails with Charger Trails: Creating Confident, Contributing Community Members

      2002

      Looking for ideas to create a sustainable program that develops social and emotional life skills necessary for individual and community wellbeing? Join us as we share the story of Charger Trails, a dynamic, faculty-created program that expands and enriches the total education of our students. Return to your schools better equipped to enhance programming that empowers students to become confident, contributing community members.
      Presented ByMarti Jenkins and Kelly Wiebe, Cary Academy (NC)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow do faculty create meaningful topics and self-reflective activities? How do schools foster ownership and empower expertise amongst faculty?  How do schools involve parents in supporting their children in these programs?
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    • Courageous Conversations: Advancing School Engagement around Race and Equity

      3020

      To unleash the rich potential of diverse perspectives, says scholar Cornel West, “We must be prepared to enter the conversation and be prepared to be changed by it.” Learn about a strategic, multi-year process, involving frameworks and protocols designed for large-scale institutional transformation, that is yielding results at The Dalton School and The Spence School.
      Presented ByEllanor (Bodie) N Brizendine and Susan Parker, The Spence School (NY); Glenn Singleton, Pacific Educational Group; Caroline Blackwell, NAIS; Ellen Stein and Lisa Waller, The Dalton School (NY)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow do you engage a whole school in conversations about race? How do you build school-wide capacity to capitalize on the richness of different perspectives and to develop equity of voice and presence? How do you integrate equity and inclusivity as part of the whole?
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    • Praise, Perfection, and Other Inhibitors to Girls' Confidence: How One School Is Changing Its Culture

      2005

      Research indicates that girls who succeed in the classroom paradoxically struggle with confidence once they enter the workplace. In our efforts to close this confidence gap, we will share strategies for how we are changing classroom practices as well as the culture of our school to address five primary inhibitors to girls’ confidence: perfectionism, fear of failure, sensitivity to criticism, the language of self-doubt, and comparison.
      Presented ByArmistead Lemon, Jess Hill, Jenny Jervis, Adam Wilsman, Katy Bowers, Buffy Baker, and Maddie Waud, Harpeth Hall School (TN)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreWhat is the latest research on girls and confidence, and how do these issues manifest themselves in the classroom, and later, in the workplace? What can we do as faculty and administrators to mitigate the major inhibitors to girls' confidence, namely perfectionism, fear of failure, sensitivity to criticism, the language of self-doubt, and comparison?  How are we educating our faculty, alumnae, and our parent community in order to shift the culture of our school?
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    • Responding to Claims of Bullying

      3018

      When parents or students complain of bullying, how should schools respond?  What is required to ensure that schools are protecting themselves from lawsuits and the students from harm?  This presentation will take participants through several case studies and an interactive discussion that will reveal exactly what is required in response to claims of bullying.
      Presented ByMichael Blacher, Liebert Cassidy Whitmore; James Busby, The Buckley School (CA)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreWhat is required of a school in the face of a claim of bullying?  Who should conduct an investigation into a claim of bullying?  What information may be shared at the conclusion of the investigation?
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    • Youth Sharing Their Inspiration Globally: Bring TEDxYouthDay to Your School

      3003

      This workshop will provide step-by-step resources on how to apply for a license, what the requirements are for participation and what tasks must be completed in order to organize a TEDxYouthDay event.
      Presented ByJill Brown, Albuquerque Academy (NM) and Larry Kahn, The Bay School of San Francisco (CA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow do you organize a TEDxYouthDay event? What leadership and volunteer opportunities does this provide for your students? How can this event help market your school?
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  • Block 4 (Friday, February 26, 8:00 - 9:00 AM)
    • Ethical Choices: Developing 21st Century Leaders

      2003

      How do we equip students to navigate 21st century issues and become ethical leaders? This workshop presents a values-based approach to ethical decision-making and provides you with the skills needed to facilitate ethical conversations in your classroom. Participants will receive case studies, sample topics, and a decision-making protocol.
      Presented ByEva Lazar and Karen Rezach, Kent Place School (NJ)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore How do we equip our students to navigate this 21st century landscape and become tomorrow’s ethical leaders? What tools can we provide to students to help them identify their own values and become familiar with the ethical decision-making process? How can educators implement the ethical decision-making process in different settings and disciplines?
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    • Gender and Sexuality Diversity in PK – 12: Old Story? Same Story? New Story.

      2006

      Gender and sexuality have always been core aspects of identity development for PreK-12 students, yet in 2016, educators are unsure about how/when/whether to engage with these issues at school. Gender and sexual diversity is a contemporary framework for understanding socio-emotional and cognitive aspects of gender identity and sexual identity development of all students. Explore language/skills/curriculum. Bring questions, humility and humor!
      Presented ByJennifer Bryan, Team Finch Consultants
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can PreK-12 educators organize their thinking about biological sex, gender identity, and sexuality identity development? What is the developmentally appropriate language to use with children and parents when discussing gender and sexuality diversity? How can the gender and sexual diversity framework be used to inform  programs, policies, and curricula?
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    • Staying Ahead Of The Curve: Addressing Student Sexual Assault

      2014

      Over the last five years, higher education has received all of the attention regarding student sexual assault.  That focus will likely shift to K-12 institutions. This session will provide an in-depth discussion of student sexual assault, assess potential legal claims against K-12 schools, and discuss best practices and practical steps schools can take to mitigate risk.
      Presented ByScott Schneider and Suzanne Bogdan, Fisher & Phillips, LLP (FL)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore What can K-12 schools learn from the way colleges and universities have handled student sexual assault? What proactive steps can K-12 schools take to manage risk associated with student sexual assault? What legal claims are being brought against K-12 schools in the area of student sexual assault?
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    • The Journey: Fostering Meaningful Institutional Work on Equity and Inclusion

      3001

      Equity and inclusion are central to many independent school missions. But what does that commitment look like “on the ground”?  How are schools encouraging faculty to stretch in these areas?  In this session, two department chairs and two school administrators will discuss their practical efforts to keep equity and inclusion at the heart of school decision-making from the board room to the classroom.
      Presented ByBlake Spraggins, Holly Hinderlie, Marjo Talbott, Nicholas Michalopoulos, and Laurel Reitman, Maret School (DC)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow can schools foster honest conversation about equity and inclusion?  What practical measures can help schools approach issues of equity and inclusion?  What first steps are practical in my own school setting?
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  • Block 5 (Friday, February 26, 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM)
    • Building a (True) Blend: Beyond the Misconception of “Just Add Technology”

      3024

      From face-to-face and virtual class scheduling to remote learning spaces, student attendance to faculty accountability when not “on campus,” blended learning requires administrators and faculty to think further outside the box than ever before.  With this exploration come failures and triumphs to be shared.
      Presented ByShannon Cleary and Shyla Russell, Hawaii Technology Academy PCS (HI)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What are the benefits of properly funding a functional blended-program? What are the common misconceptions about the buzzword, “one-to-one”? What is the true need for facilities when you move to a blended program?
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    • Drawing The Lines: Exploring Disciplinary Policies And Practices

      2004

      In an interactive format, an experienced school lawyer will help participants think critically and creatively about discipline in independent schools. Together, presenter and attendees will examine key components of the disciplinary process, including the role and composition of disciplinary committees. Attendees will be exposed to creative ideas for disciplinary policies and protocols from a legal and practical perspective.
      Presented BySara Schwartz, Schwartz Hannum PC
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can schools create disciplinary policies that are effective while still allowing for teachable moments? What types of disciplinary reporting policies are most effective in balancing all the interests at stake? What are the best methods to inform students and parents about expectations for behavior and the consequences that may ensue when students violate school policies?
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    • Failure 101: Using Disappointments, Frustrations and Stumbles to Teach Character and Grit

      2006

      This workshop will explore literature on the subject of failure and how to use the emotions associated with it as teachable tools. Exercises will be introduced that create discomfort, allowing for authentic discussion and exploration of the topic. The goal is to assist students in reframing how they view the missteps in life, and how these moments can be used by students as positive experiences to grow, mature and build critical life skills.
      Presented ByMike Donegan, Loomis Chaffee School (CT)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can the necessity of struggles and failures be taught to students in such an entitled age? How can you best identify when a student's struggle becomes unhealthy and thus not productive for them? How can messaging the need for failure be shared with parents so they can best partner with us in our efforts?
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    • Preparing a Transformative Day of Study on Invisible Learning Differences

      2016

      Carolina Friends School developed a full day, student-led program on the topic of invisible learning differences. Including both a student panel discussing how their own autism affects them personally, and afternoon breakout sessions of simulations of other learning differences, the day left all students better informed and empowered to consider these topics. You will leave the workshop with ideas of how to approach this complex topic.
      Presented ByAnna Lynch, Carolina Friends School (NC)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow can I envision a day of instruction led by students that teaches other neuro-typical students about learning differences? What can students learn about one another to encourage empathy, admiration, and respect? How does the sharing of his or her learning difference with peers empower a student who is sharing?
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    • Revisiting Diversity - Including Ability in Diversity Education

      2020

      Diversity education has become a mainstay in independent school curricula across the country, its lessons preparing students to participate in a multicultural global community. However, much of the diversity curricula excludes discourse on ability, limiting student awareness of critical members in our society. Learn strategies to include ability education in your school.
      Presented ByKristen Van de Geer and Linda Rapciak, The Meadowbrook School of Weston (MA)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore Why is it important that we integrate ability into the national conversation on diversity/multiculturalism and identity education in independent schools? How does the exploration of ability add to the social-emotional development of students and promote a culture of inclusion in our schools? What are some programs in which independent schools can participate to offer authentic opportunities for mainstream students to gain understanding, respect and compassion for their peers with disabilities?
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  • Block 6 (Friday, February 26, 1:30 - 2:30 PM)
    • Becoming a Relational School: Leveraging Relational Tools to Transform School Culture

      3024

      Do you have an advising program that is stuck in the past and is a source of frustration for faculty, students, and parents?  Come learn from a school that radically shifted their program into one that is crafted around deep engagement, a growth mindset, and solid cross-departmental teams.  When relational resources are deployed effectively, school culture shifts.
      Presented ByAlexandra Lockett and Shoba Farrell, San Francisco University High School (CA) and Ellen Porter Honnet, Stanley H. King Counseling Institute (MA)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      Explore How can relationships be leveraged to shift school culture and climate? How can a school based on solid relationships lead to deeper and more fulfilling faculty and student engagement? What are daily practices and small acts which promote relational resources in schools?
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    • New Leadership Model: Building and Sustaining Faculty Multicultural Leaders

      2010

      Using case studies examine two initiatives demonstrating a sustained culture of faculty leadership and commitment to multicultural education. Inquiry for Equity, an innovative professional development process, builds collaborative inquiry and self-reflection. Faculty-organized, proactive, schoolwide Teach-Ins arose in response to news about police brutality.
      Presented ByCharlotte Worsley, Courtney Rein, Laurie Williams, Jennifer Starkweather, Dawn Jefferson, and Ben Slater, The Urban School of San Francisco (CA)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow can I create a faculty professional development program that goes beyond one-day conferences and builds faculty commitment to creating more equitable classroom practices? How can I empower faculty to collaborate in teaching each other about issues of diversity, inclusion and equity? How can I create space and time for faculty to translate their knowledge expertise, and questions  into teach-ins that can responsively inform students  about important current events?
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    • Promoting Student Well-Being

      3018

      Academic rigor has ruled much of the education landscape for the last couple of decades. However, more talk of student balance, health, wellbeing, character, and other elements have been quickly taking over the horizon. These aspects are fundamental to the independent school experience and the missions behind many of our institutions. How are our student faring? What are some of the great practices happening in our schools?
      Presented ByDebra Wilson, National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS); Jonathan Cohen, National School Climate Center; Emily Jones, The Putney School (VT); Scott Bezsylko, Winston Prep (NY); John Gulla, The Edward E. Ford Foundation
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      LevelIntroductory
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      Explore What is the data on independent school health and wellbeing? What are some great practices independent schools are engaging in? What are some approaches schools should be thinking about to take student health and wellbing into their own corridors?
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    • Redefining Normal: Including Our Youngest Learners in Schoolwide Diversity Initiatives

      2012

      Learn how to bring antibias and diversity work into early childhood classrooms. Creating a new "normal" requires teachers, students, and families to lean into discomfort and reflect on gender, family structure, race, and culture as we share our own stories. Study Pre-K examples as model ways of implementing meaningful lessons that redefine what "normal" means within independent schools.
      Presented BySemeka Smith-Williams and Lynnette Arthur, The Packer Collegiate Institute
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow can I avoid stereotyping on the basis of gender, race, ability, age, class, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, and other social identifiers and encourage my students to avoid stereotyping as well? How can I encourage my class to practice positive and inclusive language and behavior? How can I  share anti-bias work with families to achieve a positive long-lasting results?
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    • Trailblazers from China: Marry School Mission and Cultural Expectations for Asian Students

      2011

      Attracting students from China can significantly enrich the learning experience and create opportunities for cultural awareness in independent schools. Important cultural variations exist within China that can impact students at independent schools differently. Find out what works and what doesn’t from a career educator and business person with significant experience in China.
      Presented ByKathleen McNamara, Seven Hills School (CA); and Mary Wadsworth Darby, Peridot Scholastic Advisors
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow are Chinese students different from typical American students and how do this affect students’ cultural adjustment to life in the independent school? What strategies will help you be more successful in meeting the needs of your students from greater China and managing their parents’ aspirations/expectations? What are the most common mistakes that schools make in dealing with families from China?
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  • Three-Hour Workshops (Wednesday, Feburary 24, 1:00 - 4:00 PM)
    • W07. Differentiated Mindfulness Practices For Better Classroom Learning

      2007

      Optional Three-Hour Workshop

      Learn new mindfulness approaches and day-to-day practices as you gain a deeper understanding using experiential methods that explore mindful breathing, seeing, listening, speaking, communicating, and teaching. Age-appropriate for lower, middle, and upper divisions, these practices work in the classroom or at home for you, your students, and their families.
      Presented ByDaniel Lauter, Mindful Sync
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow can mindfulness practices be customized and made more accessible? How can we differentiate mindfulness teaching? How can we experience the stillness within through breathing, sound, storytelling, and visual imagery?
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    • W08. Elevating the Black Male: Developing Culturally Competent Schools

      2008

      Optional Three-Hour Workshop

      Examine the societal perceptions of young black males that perpetuate racial disparities in education. Build cultural competence to develop a learning environment that fosters academic success for young black males. When you gain the cultural competence requisite to reach black male students, you develop the competencies needed to reach all students.
      Presented ByOmekongo Dibinga, Upstander International (DC)
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreHow do awareness, knowledge, and understanding of one’s own culture promote effective teaching and learning?  How do awareness, knowledge, and understanding of the cultures of students promote effective teaching and learning? How can educators establish culturally sensitive learning environments and modify instruction to be culturally reflective?
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    • W11. Forget “The Talk:” Best Practices in Sexuality Education for Today's World, PK-6

      3000

      Optional Three-Hour Workshop

      Pre-kindergarten and lower schools increasingly grapple with the impact of a highly sexualized culture on young children. Ironically these schools teach basic sexuality education benchmarks four to seven years late, indirectly enabling peers, older children, the Internet, marketers, and mass media to become children’s primary educators. Learn how your school can embrace a successful, truly age-appropriate program.
      Presented ByDeborah Roffman, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
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      LevelIntermediate
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      ExploreHow can schools re-imagine sexuality education in the early grades and engage parents as authentic and enthusiastic partners? What are the truly age appropriate benchmarks for preschool and lower school children around sex, gender, and reproduction? What best practices create safe, open, and honest places for young children to ask and learn about sexuality in healthy ways, and to identify the immediate nurturing adults in their lives as their primary source of information and guidance?
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    • W16. Navigating All Things Gender: Concepts and Language to Support Students across the Spectrum

      2024

      Optional Three-Hour Workshop

      Administrators and teachers increasingly need policies and language to serve students with a wide variety of gender identities (transgender, cisgender, agender, etc.) in every aspect of school life: from admissions and athletics to curriculum and beyond. Possessing an informed, thoughtful, and contemporary understanding of gender is rapidly emerging as an indispensable 21st century skill. The concepts offered here--- which have been used with educators for the past 15 years--- are intended to prepare school leaders faced with questions about policy, programs, and values.
      Presented ByJennifer Bryan, Team Finch Consultants
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      LevelIntroductory
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      ExploreWhat are the ways that expanding 21st century notions of gender impact school life? What kinds of transgender-related changes in policy, program, and school culture are supported by your mission? What is the best approach to educating faculty, parents, and students about these issues?
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